Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
David: Welcome to chineseclass101.com. I am David.
Echo: Hi! 大家好,我是(Dàjiā hǎo, wǒ shì)Echo.
David: With us, you learn to speak Chinese with fun and effective lessons.
Echo: We will also provide you with cultural insights.
David: And tips you won’t find in the textbook. Today, we are here with absolute beginner, season 2, lesson 20.
Echo: The not so sweet tooth.
David: Right. Some people like sweet things, some people don’t.
Echo: Like me.
David: Yes Echo is in the not sweet candy. Anyway, we’ve got a conversation here which takes place outside McDonald's.
Echo: And it’s between two close friends.
David: Right. They are deciding what kind of treats they want to eat.
Echo: Yeah.
David: So if you like MacDonald’s, this is the lesson for you.
Echo: Right and they are speaking casual Mandarin as always.
David: Yeah we’ve got a dialogue for you. We are going to take you there in a sec. Before we do, we want to remind you that all of these lessons we are teaching a new vocab and it’s really easy to forget it if you are not reviewing it with our flashcards. So come to chineseclass101, visit the Premium learning center and you can test yourself really quickly to help the stuff stick. With that though, let’s get to your dialogue.
DIALOGUE
A: 来一杯奶昔吧?(Lái yì bēi nǎixī ba?)
B: 我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
A: 来一个圣代?(Lái yí gè shèngdài?)
B: 我说了,我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ shuō le, wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
David: One more time, a bit slower.
A: 来一杯奶昔吧?(Lái yì bēi nǎixī ba?)
B: 我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
A: 来一个圣代?(Lái yí gè shèngdài?)
B: 我说了,我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ shuō le, wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
David: And now with the English.
A: 来一杯奶昔吧?(Lái yì bēi nǎixī ba?)
A: Want a milkshake?
B: 我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
B: I don't like sweet things.
A: 来一个圣代?(Lái yí gè shèngdài?)
A: Do you want a sundae?
B: 我说了,我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ shuō le, wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
B: I said, I don't like sweet things.
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
David: So Echo has no sweet tooth.
Echo: No. What about you?
David: I don’t care with it. I can take it or leave it as they say.
Echo: Yeah I don’t even like ice cream. The chocolate is fine but not too much.
David: Echo is a fan of the chocolate.
Echo: Yeah but not too much.
David: Echo says that. I am not sure it’s true. I have yet to see Echo hits her limit on chocolate but if it’s the summer, you might be interested in ice cream and that’s really what our lesson is about. So let’s get to the vocab section.
VOCAB LIST
David: And now the vocab section.
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)[natural native speed]
David: Milk shake.
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)[natural native speed]
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)[natural native speed]
David: Sundae.
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)[natural native speed]
Echo: 奶茶。(Nǎichá.)[natural native speed]
David: Milk, tea.
Echo: 奶茶。(Nǎichá.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 奶茶。(Nǎichá.)[natural native speed]
Echo: 糖。(Táng.)[natural native speed]
David: Sugar.
Echo: 糖。(Táng.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 糖。(Táng.)[natural native speed]
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)[natural native speed]
David: Sweet.
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)[natural native speed]
Echo: 杯。(Bēi.)[natural native speed]
David: Glass.
Echo: 杯。(Bēi.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
Echo: 杯。(Bēi.)[natural native speed]
VOCAB AND PHRASE USAGE
David: Okay so our vocab today is all about sweets and ice cream and the first word we want to call your attention is
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)
David: Which means Sundae.
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)
David: As in a chocolate Sundae.
Echo: 巧克力圣代。(Qiǎokèlì shèng dài.)
David: A strawberry Sundae.
Echo: 草莓圣代。(Cǎoméi shèng dài.)
David: Now if you go to MacDonald’s for this, you are going to find that they don’t actually call their staff.
Echo: 圣代。(Shèng dài.)
David: They have a special word
Echo: 新地。新地。(Xīndì. Xīndì.)
David: Right. So the MacDonald’s Sundae is a bit different than the Sundae’s elsewhere I guess. I don’t know how this happened to Echo.
Echo: I don’t know, I really don’t know. I don’t like 甜的。(Tián de.)
David: It’s a total mystery.
Echo: Yeah.
David: But there is a useful word too, the word for sweet.
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)
David: Sweet.
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)
David: And you said, 甜的(Tián de) which would be sweet things.
Echo: Right 甜的。(Tián de.)
David: I don’t like sweet things.
Echo: 我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
David: In addition to a Sundae, we also have a milk shake.
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)
David: Milk shake.
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)[slowly - broken down by syllable]
David: And milk is
Echo: 奶。(Nǎi.)
David: And that’s coming from cow milk.
Echo: 牛奶。(Niúnǎi.)
David: What’s that 昔(Xī) there?
Echo: I don’t know.
David: No one knows.
Echo: I really don’t know.
David: Like it’s – you also I guess run into smoothies. Is that a 果昔。(Guǒ xī.)
Echo: Yeah 果昔。(Guǒ xī.)
David: Okay so we’ve got Sundae. So we’ve got milk shake.
Echo: 奶昔。(Nǎi xī.)
David: And smoothies.
Echo: 果昔。(Guǒ xī.)
David: In our vocab list, we also gave you the word milk tea.
Echo: 奶茶。(Nǎichá.)
David: Milk tea.
Echo: 奶茶。(Nǎichá.)
David: You don’t actually run into this in the Mainland that often but you will see it in Taiwan and Hong Kong.
Echo: It’s actually more and more popular here.
David: Yeah they are bringing it in and you can order it by saying Bring me a glass of milk tea.
Echo: 来一杯奶茶。(Lái yībēi nǎichá.)
David: Bring me a glass of milk tea.
Echo: 来一杯奶茶。(Lái yībēi nǎichá.)
David: You don’t really like milk tea.
Echo: Right because it is 太甜(Tài tián) and with too much 糖.(Táng.)
David: Right those words are easy to mix up. There is the word sweet.
Echo: 甜。(Tián.)
David: And the word sugar.
Echo: 糖。(Táng.)
David: Sweet
Echo: 甜。(Tián)
David: Sugar
Echo: 糖。(Táng.)
David: So if someone tries to give you an ice cream or a milkshake and you are Echo, you will tell them I don’t like sweets.
Echo: 我不喜欢甜的。(Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de.)
David: And don’t add sugar.
Echo: 别加糖。(Bié jiātáng.)
David: So a sweet lesson so far and it’s only getting it sweeter as we move into the grammar section.
Echo: 没错儿。(Méi cuò ér.)
LESSON FOCUS
David: In today’s grammar section, we are focusing on a special verb.
Echo: Yeah very sweet.
David: Yeah.
Echo: 来。(Lái.)
David: To come.
Echo: 来。(Lái.)
David: Or to bring.
Echo: Especially in this lesson.
David: Right. So this is a verb with two meanings and that’s why we are focusing on it today. In the dialogue, we heard it in this sentence.
Echo: 来一杯奶昔吧。(Lái yībēi nǎi xī ba.)
David: Let’s hear that again.
Echo: 来一杯奶昔吧。(Lái yībēi nǎi xī ba.)
David: Now we translated that as want a milkshake. Really it’s a suggestion.
Echo: Yeah.
David: We’ve got 吧(Ba) in the end making it a suggestion and 来(Come) here means to bring.
Echo: Right.
David: So it literally means come with a milk shake.
Echo: 来一杯奶昔吧。(Lái yībēi nǎi xī ba.)
David: Now our point for this lesson is just to be careful of this because the meaning of this verb changes in context.
Echo: Right.
David: We’ve already encountered this in simple sentences like
Echo: 我来北京。(Wǒ lái běijīng.)
David: I come to Beijing.
Echo: 我来北京。(Wǒ lái běijīng.)
David: I come to Beijing. So the meaning is nonambiguous here. It’s really clear.
Echo: Just like 稍等,来了。(Shāo děng, láile.)
David: Wait a minute, I am coming.
Echo: 稍等,来了。(Shāo děng, láile.)
David: Wait a minute, I am coming but we also see this when we order food. As in the sentence..
Echo: 来一瓶啤酒。(Lái yī píng píjiǔ.)
David: Bring me a beer.
Echo: 来一瓶啤酒。(Lái yī píng píjiǔ.)
David: Bring me a beer or maybe
Echo: 来一杯水。(Lái yībēi shuǐ.)
David: Bring me a glass of water.
Echo: 来一杯水。(Lái yībēi shuǐ.)
David: So the meanings are related, but they are not exactly the same. And it really comes from being in a restaurant and having something bring something to you, right because it comes.
Echo: Right.
David: However in the dialogue, the waitress isn’t actually going to bring them milkshake. So we are going to run into it in this context as would you like.
Echo: Right.
David: So one verb, but two meanings. If you have any questions or you’d like more examples, be sure to check out our write up in our premium PDF. It has a transcript, a cultural insight as well as the write up all embedded text .
OUTRO
David: With that though, that’s our lesson for today. If you have any questions.
Echo: You can always write to us at contactus@chineseclass101.com.
David: And if you have any chocolate, Echo was waiting for it.
Echo: Please save it.
David: Any way, we hope you liked the lesson and we will hope to see you on the site. From Beijing, I am David.
Echo: 我是(Wǒ shì)Echo。
David: Thanks a lot for listening and we will see you soon.
Echo: See you on the site.
David: Bye, bye.

21 Comments

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ChineseClass101.com
Monday at 6:30 pm
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For easy access to sundaes and milkshakes in China, just go to the nearest McDonald's and find their 甜品站 tián pǐn zhàn. Here you can have easy access through a drive through like window to all sorts of sweet treats.

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Chineseclass101.com
Thursday at 9:06 am
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Hi diverkim,


Thank you for posting.


You can download the Lesson transcript to check about the word for smoothies. To download it, select on “.Download PDFs” the option ” Lesson Transcript”, choose “Save link as”, choose the folder in your computer to save the file and then click on “save” to save the pdf file in your PC.


If you have any doubts, please let us know.   :wink:



Cristiane

Team KoreanClass101.com

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diverkim
Friday at 11:58 am
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Nice lesson, but you mentioned smoothies in audio but it was a disappointment not to be found in notes or in pdf?

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Team ChineseClass101.com
Saturday at 12:33 pm
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Amber


Thank you for your long comment.

Now Chinese people use sugar more and more. Dessert shops are started here and there.

Actually I don't like sweet drinks but I really love sweet fruits.


Cho

Team ChineseClass101.com

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Amber
Wednesday at 8:33 am
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It's funny how Westerners love sugar, but Easterners do not. Even snacks from the same brand are flavored differently depending on the country or market: a pack of Oreo cookies in the U.S.A. will have much more sugar or sweetness than Oreos sold in China. The U.K. is also known for very decadent sugar sweets and pastries. It must be a cultural thing, but it can also be personal taste as well. Not everyone in the West loves chocolate, cake, or sweet tea, for example, and there are plenty of people in Asia who enjoy sweets, so I think it's personal taste as well as cultural influence.


I've actually tried milk tea here in the U.S. Usually, it's called Boba tea, pearl tea, or bubble tea, and comes with tapioca pearls. It depends on the flavor or how it's made, but it can be really creamy and sweet, and the kind I've had are always served cold with ice. It originally came from cafes in Taiwan, and has been imported to different countries ever since. For me, it's kind of expensive and very filling and sugary, so I only get it once in a while. One of my favorite flavors is avocado -- it had real avocado fruit, and it was surprisingly delicious! Taro and mango are also some of my favorite flavors, too.

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Alexis 亚历克西 (Yà lì kè xī)
Monday at 8:29 pm
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谢谢 Olivia! Great explanation!

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ChineseClass101.com
Monday at 8:00 pm
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Hi Alexis 亚历克西,


That's correct! If you want to say " I don’t like cold things", it's 我不喜欢冷的. :thumbsup:

的 (de) in this kind of expression goes behind the adjective to mean "something that's [adjective]", for example,

甜的 "something that's sweet"

冷的 "something that's cold"


Keep up the good work!!:smile:

Olivia

Team ChineseClass101.com

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Alexis 亚历克西 (Yà lì kè xī)
Friday at 7:01 pm
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A sweet lesson! 谢谢你!


I was wondering about the expression in the notes Wǒ bù xǐhuān tián de. (我不喜欢甜的) Does the de 的 change sweet into sweet things. For example, would I say I don't like cold things with the expression 我不喜欢冷的?

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ChineseClass101.com
Tuesday at 5:50 pm
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Hi Eddie,


Yes, it's "ping2" plus erhua. In the north of China, you'll hear more people saying "ping2r" instead of "ping2".


Echo

Team ChineseClass101.com

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Eddie
Monday at 6:10 pm
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Hello :smile: At about 9:22 in the audio I'm hearing a measure word for beer (pijiu) that I don't recognise. I know "bei" (glass) and "ping" (bottle) but it sounds to me like "pier". I was wondering whether it was just "ping" with some kind of erhua (儿?) at the end of it, but I can't find reference to it in any dictionaries.

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ChineseClass101.com
Friday at 4:48 pm
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Hi Will,


It tastes like tea plus milk... Can't really explain :mrgreen:


Echo

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