Dialogue

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Lesson Transcript

Start speaking Chinese in minutes and grasp the language, culture and customs in just minutes more with Chinese survival phrases, a completely new way to master the basics of Chinese. To get more Chinese lessons and for free, go to chineseclass101.com and sign up for your free lifetime account. Signing up takes less than a minute and you will find more great lessons just like this one. To get more free Chinese lessons, go to chineseclass101.com
Hey guys, hopefully in China, you will make friends. In fact, Chinese people are actually very friendly and if you make friends, you probably want to keep in touch with them. Today’s lesson is going to be all about that. We are going to start with, please give me your telephone number. In Chinese, this is 请给我你的电话号码(Qǐng gěi wǒ nǐ de diànhuà hàomǎ.) So the tones for this are 请(qǐng), third tone, 给(gěi), third tone, 我(wǒ), third tone, 你(nǐ), third tone, four third tones in a row. So the first three third tones become second tones to make it flow better, 请(qíng), second tone, rising tone, 请(qíng). 给(géi), second tone rising tone, 给(géi). 我(wó), second tone rising tone, 我(wó). 你(nǐ), third tone falling rising tone, 你(nǐ). 的(de), no tone, 的(de). 电(diàn), fourth tone falling tone, 电(diàn). 话(huà), fourth tone falling tone, 话(huà). 号(hào), fourth tone falling tone, 号(hào). 码(mǎ), third tone, falling rising tone, 码(mǎ). 请给我你的电话号码(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànhuà hàomǎ.) Broken down component by component, meaning by meaning, this is 请(qǐng) which is third tone but becomes second tone in this phrase, it means please. 给(gěi) which is also third tone but becomes 给(géi), second tone in this phrase is to give. 我(wǒ) is me or I. So literally we have 请给我(Qíng géi wǒ), please give me, 请给我(Qíng géi wǒ). Now after that, 你(nǐ), you, third tone, the falling rising tone, 你(nǐ). 的(de), the possessive, no tone, 的(de). Together 你的(nǐ de) becomes your, 的(de) changes you into your. 电话(diànhuà), telephone, fourth tone, fourth tone, 电话(diànhuà). 号码(hàomǎ), number, fourth tone, third tone, 号码(hàomǎ). So altogether we have, please give me your telephone number, very simple, right guys? 请给我你的电话号码(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànhuà hàomǎ.) Please give me your telephone number, 请给我你的电话号码(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànhuà hàomǎ.). But the first part of this phrase is very useful. You can use it in all kinds of situation. Please give me your, 请给我你的(Qíng géi wó nǐ de) and then you can just change the noun, your what, 请给我你的(Qíng géi wó nǐ de) what. So we are going to change that to email address. When you are traveling, often it makes a lot more sense to get somebody’s email address and their telephone number. Especially if you are getting a Chinese person’s telephone number. If you have to ask for their telephone number in Chinese, I have a feeling that telephone call isn’t going to go very smoothly. Also you probably don’t have a phone and phones aren’t that convenient once you are out of the country. If you just want to stay in touch, maybe email is much better. So 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.), this means, please give me your email address. 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.) One more time, 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.) So broken down again by tones, 请(qǐng), second tone, rising tone, 请(qǐng). 给(gěi), second tone rising tone, 给(gěi). 我(wǒ), second tone rising tone, 我(wǒ). 你(nǐ), third tone falling rising tone, 你(nǐ). 的(de), no tone. 电(diàn), fourth tone falling tone, 电(diàn). 子(zǐ), third tone, the falling rising tone, 子(zǐ). 邮(yóu), second tone, the rising tone, 邮(yóu). 箱(xiāng), first tone, the flat tone, 箱(xiāng). 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.) So when using this phrase, the only thing that changes is the noun, what comes after please give me your. Here we changed it from phone number to email. Now actually 电子邮箱(diànzǐ yóuxiāng) is kind of formal. It’s not really something people say most of the time. In fact, most Chinese people will say email. They just say email. There is no character for email. You just write email in English. Almost all young people I would guess all young people but I don’t want to say all would know the word email. So you can say 请给我你的email地址(Qíng géi wó nǐ de email dìzhǐ.). 地址(dì zhǐ.) means address. So email 地址(dì zhǐ) means address. You could probably say just email but we are going to practice with 地址(dì zhǐ). So 请给我你的email地址(Qíng géi wó nǐ de email dìzhǐ.) So the tones for this are email, of course is English and so has no tones and then 地址(dì zhǐ), 地(dì) is fourth tone, the falling tone, 地(dì) and then 址(zhǐ) is third tone, the falling rising tone, 址(zhǐ), 地址(dì zhǐ), email 地址(dì zhǐ).
All right, to close our today’s lesson, we’d like you to practice what we’ve just learned. I will provide you with the English equivalent of a phrase and you are responsible for shouting it out loud. You will have a few seconds before I give you the answer. So 加油(Jiā yóu!) Please give me your phone number, 请给我你的电话号码(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànhuà hàomǎ.) Please give me your email address, the more formal way, 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.) The less formal way of saying please give me your email address, 请给我你的email地址(Qíng géi wó nǐ de email dìzhǐ.).
Remember to go to chineseclass101.com and sign up for your free lifetime account. Signing up takes less than 1 minute and you will find more great lessons just like this one. Chinese survival phrases will have you speaking with proper pronunciation and arm you with cultural insights and other information to utterly shock and amaze your friends, teachers, colleagues and the people you meet along the way.

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ChineseClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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This is a great way to make friends in China

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Monday at 07:05 AM
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你好 robert groulx,


谢谢 for posting and studying with us. If you have any questions, please let us know.😄


Kind regards,

雷文特 (Levente)

Team ChineseClass101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 11:40 PM
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thank you for the lsson transcript


favorite phrase is, 请给我你的电子邮箱(Qíng géi wó nǐ de diànzǐ yóuxiāng.)


robert

Dennis
Thursday at 03:38 PM
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I find it interesting that msn replaces the word for email. I had an online experience with this today and I was also confused when asked for my QQ, but thanks to this lesson now I know.

richard
Tuesday at 05:50 AM
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@student,

i think Amber is correct in her reply. i'm sure CC101 welcome all comments

but amateur criticism is what is irritating.

thorough explanation and repetition is better.

Amber
Tuesday at 02:27 AM
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hi student,


Just listened to the podcast, I find that the native speaker's pronunciation of 电子邮箱 (diànzǐ yóuxiāng) is accurate. The 'g' ending is not a 'g' sound like we would hear in English, it's more of a nasal sound when found at the end of the 'ang' pinyin grouping. It's very subtle, so easy to miss.


As far as the tone mentions, yes perhaps our host is a little overzealous; however these survival phrases are intended for absolute beginners to Chinese, therefore they tend to be quite thorough in their explanations.

student
Monday at 11:28 PM
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okay, seriously, it's not at all necessary to say "flat tone, rising tone, curving tone, falling tone, no tone " after every time "1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, neutral" tones are mentioned. Not only is that irritating, but it's also a waste of time.

If listeners don't know how tones sound, then hearing "flat tone, rising tone, curving tone, falling tone, no tone " is probably not going to be at all helpful anyway.


Also, why does the native Chinese speaker sound like he's saying "dian zi you xian" , rather than " dian zi you xiang" ? Isn't he saying 电子邮箱?If so, the last character is xiāng, but for some reason I'm hearing him say xiān.