Dialogue

Vocabulary

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Lesson Transcript

INTRODUCTION
Victor: 大家好,我是Victor。
Amber: And I'm Amber, and welcome back to Gengo Chinese, this is lesson 12.
Victor: Get Where You Need To Go With a Mobile Chinese Language Partner.
Amber: Yes, what can be better? So little does he know, but Maike is soon to find that taxi drivers can be your very best friend.
Victor: If he plays his cards right.
Amber: Best friends with cars, no less! What I mean, though, is that they are like captive language partners.
Victor: Definitely.
Amber: Yeah, I mean the taxi sit there, you know, all day totally bored out of their minds behind the wheel and they are ready to chat.
Victor: Oh yeah… taxi drivers in China love to chat.
Amber: Well maybe Maike can try out some of what we learned last lesson.
Victor: Let's review it a bit.
Amber: Well we learned how to talk about something very common in Shanghai. The heat and the rain.
Victor: Ah yes. The rain
Amber: And how to say it's hot. Very high-frequency language here!
Victor: Hen re!
Amber: And we also learned the word for taxi
Victor: Also very important!
Amber: And very important to be able to find one. They were in front of the hotel.
Victor: Yes, 'Zai fandian de qianmian.'
Amber: OK obviously the Chinese worked because in today's dialogue, Maike is in the taxi itself.
Victor: Let's see where he ends up!
DIALOGUE
Taxi driver: 你去哪儿?
Mike: 我去北京大厦。
Taxi driver: 你有地址吗?
Mike: 在这儿。
Taxi driver: 你会说汉语吗?
Mike: 我会说一点儿。
Taxi driver: 你的汉语不错。
Mike: 没有没有。你会说英语吗?
Taxi driver: 我?不会。
Mike: 哦。
Taxi driver: 到了。北京大厦。14块钱.
Mike: 给你钱。我要发票。
Taxi driver: 这是找你的钱,这是发票。
Mike: 谢谢。
Taxi driver: 再见!
English Host: Let’s hear the conversation one time slowly.
Taxi driver: 你去哪儿?
Mike: 我去北京大厦。
Taxi driver: 你有地址吗?
Mike: 在这儿。
Taxi driver: 你会说汉语吗?
Mike: 我会说一点儿。
Taxi driver: 你的汉语不错。
Mike: 没有没有。你会说英语吗?
Taxi driver: 我?不会。
Mike: 哦。
Taxi driver: 到了。北京大厦。14块钱.
Mike: 给你钱。我要发票。
Taxi driver: 这是找你的钱,这是发票。
Mike: 谢谢。
Taxi driver: 再见!
English Host: Now let’s hear it with the English translation.
Taxi driver: 你去哪儿?
Amber: Where are you going?
Mike: 我去北京大厦。
Amber: I'm going to the Beijing Building.
Taxi driver: 你有地址吗?
Amber: Do you have the address?
Mike: 在这儿。
Amber: It's here.
Taxi driver: 你会说汉语吗?
Amber: Can you speak Chinese?
Mike: 我会说一点儿。
Amber: I can speak a little.
Taxi driver: 你的汉语不错。
Amber: Your Chinese is pretty good.
Mike: 没有没有。你会说英语吗?
Amber: No, no. Can you speak English?
Taxi driver: 我?不会。
Amber: Me? No, I can't.
Mike: 哦。
Amber: Oh.
Taxi driver: 到了。北京大厦。14块钱.
Amber: We're here. Beijing Building. 14 RMB.
Mike: 给你钱。我要发票。
Amber: Here's the money. I need a receipt.
Taxi driver: 这是找你的钱,这是发票。
Amber: This is your change, and this is your receipt.
Mike: 谢谢。
Amber: Thanks.
Taxi driver: 再见!
Amber: Goodbye!
POST CONVERSATION BANTER
Amber: OK so trick of the trade…
Victor: What’s that Amber?
Amber: Always, ALWAYS get someone (or write yourself) the address in Chinese.
Victor: Yeah… well if you can, it’s better to be safe than sorry.
Amber: And this isn’t necessarily a language thing only… I mean the cities in China are huge. Having a concrete street name written down for the drivers really takes away some taxi anxiety for newbies.
Victor: Very good tip Amber.
Amber: So taxi man has the address, let’s look ourselves at the rest and see what we can learn.
Vocabulary and Phrases
Amber: Let's take a look at the vocabulary for this lesson.
VOCAB LIST
Victor: 去 [natural native speed]
Amber: to go
Victor: 去 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 去 [natural native speed]
Victor: 哪儿 [natural native speed]
Amber: where
Victor: 哪儿 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 哪儿 [natural native speed]
Victor: 北京 [natural native speed]
Amber: Beijing
Victor: 北京 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 北京 [natural native speed]
Victor: 大厦 [natural native speed]
Amber: building
Victor: 大厦 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 大厦 [natural native speed]
Victor: 地址 [natural native speed]
Amber: address
Victor: 地址 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 地址 [natural native speed]
Victor: 这儿 [natural native speed]
Amber: here
Victor: 这儿 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 这儿 [natural native speed]
Victor: 会 [natural native speed]
Amber: to be able to
Victor: 会 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 会 [natural native speed]
Victor: 说 [natural native speed]
Amber: to speak
Victor: 说 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 说 [natural native speed]
Victor: 汉语 [natural native speed]
Amber: Chinese language
Victor: 汉语 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 汉语 [natural native speed]
Victor: 一点儿 [natural native speed]
Amber: a bit
Victor: 一点儿 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 一点儿 [natural native speed]
Victor: 不错 [natural native speed]
Amber: pretty good
Victor: 不错 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 不错 [natural native speed]
Victor: 没有 [natural native speed]
Amber: to not have
Victor: 没有 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 没有 [natural native speed]
Victor: 英语 [natural native speed]
Amber: English
Victor: 英语 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 英语 [natural native speed]
Victor: 到 [natural native speed]
Amber: to arrive
Victor: 到 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 到 [natural native speed]
Victor: 块 [natural native speed]
Amber: measure word for money
Victor: 块 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 块 [natural native speed]
Victor: 钱 [natural native speed]
Amber: money
Victor: 钱 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 钱 [natural native speed]
Victor: 给 [natural native speed]
Amber: to give
Victor: 给 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 给 [natural native speed]
Victor: 要 [natural native speed]
Amber: to want
Victor: 要 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 要 [natural native speed]
Victor: 发票 [natural native speed]
Amber: receipt
Victor: 发票 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 发票 [natural native speed]
Victor: 这 [natural native speed]
Amber: this
Victor: 这 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 这 [natural native speed]
Victor: 是 [natural native speed]
Amber: to be
Victor: 是 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 是 [natural native speed]
Victor: 找 [natural native speed]
Amber: to give change
Victor: 找 [slowly - broken down by syllable]
Victor: 找 [natural native speed]
KEY VOCABULARY AND PHRASES
Amber: So you’ll notice that Mike refers to the building he is going to at first by name, Beijing Dasha 大厦.
Victor: Yes this is very common in China. Most office buildings have a name, and usually, that can be enough to identify where you are going, if it’s a somewhat famous building.
Amber: So the word for building used here is大厦. But you know Victor, in Shanghai, they don’t call it 大厦
Victor: Yeah?
Amber: Yeah they call buildings ‘dalou’ 大楼.
Victor: I think it’s a north/south thing. But you can use either and they will understand.
Amber: However in this case, we have a very diligent cabbie; he asks for the address. What was the word for address again Victor?
Victor: 地址.
Amber: And actually we heard this word when Lili gave Maike her email address.
Victor: Oh yes, email address
Amber: Exactly.
Victor: OK now we come to another multiple possibility word.
Amber: Yes, there are so many ways to say Chinese in Chinese!
Victor: Yes, this is a common one, the taxi driver asks ‘你会说汉语吗?’
Amber: So 汉语 means Chinese… what are some other words used to mean ‘Chinese’
Victor: So many. Well there is zhongwen, Putonghua,
Amber: And in Taiwan they say ‘guoyu’ sometimes.
Victor: Yes, well there you have it. Many words for Chinese.
Amber: Now there is another word in the dialogue that is pretty good… and that is the word ‘bu cuo’.
Victor: Now, literally ‘bu cuo’ in Chinese means ‘not wrong’ or ‘not bad’ sort of.
Amber: However there is something I have to interject here, though, is that the level of the Chinese ‘not bad’ or ‘bu cuo’ is more like our ‘pretty good’ in English.
Victor: Yeah that’s true.
Amber: Yeah because at first I would think… hmm that seems like it’s trying to be a compliment… but I feel slightly… slighted….
Victor: Yeah that’s true, in English if I say ‘Amber, that picture you painted was bu cuo… ‘not bad’… it doesn’t sound that flattering.
Amber: Yes. But when Chinese say ‘bu cuo’, they are really meaning its quite good. Or at least that’s what I like to tell myself.
Victor: No it’s really true.
Amber: OK well in the dialogue, we can see that Mike took his Chinese being bu cuo as a compliment… by his response.
Victor: Yeah we hear Maike say
Amber: Sorta bashful-like.
Victor: Yeah like ‘no no not at all’. Meiyou literally means ‘not have’.
Amber: But here its just a general sort of attempt at humble denial. Actually there are some other phrases out there, the Chinese love humble denial!
Victor: Yeah sometimes you hear people say you can respond ‘nali nali’ to a compliment.
Amber: But truth be told, this is another one of those things you see in textbooks that no one actually says, except maybe foreigners who study said textbooks.
Victor: Yeah Chinese people generally will not use nali nali so much. There is another way to respond to a compliment… more formal; its ‘guojiang’ 过奖
Amber: Which basically means ‘you are too kind’, like you are saying I’m better than I am.
Victor: Yeah but it’s a little more formal. Like for when your boss compliments you.
Amber: But one thing I did notice is that generally no matter what you say, a denial is the best policy. They don’t really say ‘thank you’ like we do in English, in response to a compliment. My Chinese friend told me that sounds a bit conceited in Chinese, is that true Victor?
Victor: Well ___________
Amber: Ok next word is ‘we’re here”! Very important to know, since likely you’ve never seen the Beijing dasha, and wont know it from the 50,000 other office buildings in the city.
Victor: Yes that is ‘dao le’. Dao means ‘to arrive’ the le indicates a change in situation… now we’re here!
Amber: Now of course Maike hands him the money.. and by the way, maybe we should pause for a moment and talk about the taxi cages!
Victor: Oh yes, you will find that your taxi driver is in a cage.
Amber: Yes but don’t be alarmed. I find China to be one of the safest, non-violent places I have ever been. The cage seems so over the top!
Victor: Yeah I think someone got attacked like once… so then everybody did it.
Amber: Yeah I mean I can see that its easy to get road rage even as a passenger in China. Anyway you’re going to be passing the money somehow through a crack in the cage.
Victor: And there is the ever important 发票
Amber: Ah yes, 发票 being ‘receipt’.
Victor: Then you’ll hear the classic ‘meter printer’
Amber: Ah a sound forever imprinted in my memory.
Victor: And most importantly, you don't want to forget your change.
Amber: Right, the driver says, 这是找你的钱. Here we hear the word for money 'qian'.
Victor: And 你的 means your. Therefore 找你的钱 means 'your change'.
Amber: So 'This is your change'
Victor: 这是找你的钱.

Lesson focus

Amber: So Victor, no need to waste time with any greetings or anything, taxi drivers get to the point.
Victor: That’s right. We hear the taxi driver say
Amber: Where are you going? And this is pretty straightforward grammar, just a couple of notes.
Victor: Well first it’s a classic sentence word order. Subject, verb, then the question word.
Amber: Subject ‘ni’ verb ‘qu’ question word ‘nar’. Now this brings us to a little diversion.
Victor: Yes, as you may know, there are 2 words for ‘where’ in Chinese. One is like we hear here ‘nar’
Amber: And the other is nali.
Victor: Either is fine, just depends where you’re from.
Amber: Or where you want to pretend you’re from!
Victor: Now one more thing of note is that in this kind of a sentence, or question, you can omit the subject.
Amber: Yes, cabbies love brevity, so very often you will just hear them say ‘qu nar’ or ‘qu nali’.
Victor: Or sometimes, even just ‘nar’ or ‘nali’.
Amber: Anyway this is your clue to spit out where you’re going. Be prepared for some confusion or discussion. Giving an address in a city of 18 million is not a simple operation.
Victor: Yeah if it's not a famous place, it really helps to know the destination.
Amber: Now they get themselves sorted, thanks to the ever-valuable ‘piece of paper with address written on it’.
Victor: Yes and then the chatting begins.
Amber: There’s something quick we can review that we learned in lesson 4, and that is where they talk about ability, to speak languages.
Victor: Yes, 你会说汉语吗?
Amber: Can you speak Chinese?
Victor: And of course, the countering ‘你会说英语吗?’
Amber: So we use this verb ‘hui’ to express ability. So Victor, what can you ‘hui’?
Victor: _______________
Amber: Wo hui _____________.
Victor: And one more grammar point to review. Talking about ‘wanting’ something.
Amber: Yes, I want… a receipt
Victor: Very common phrase in a taxi
Amber: This verb ‘yao’ is used in a few different ways, but in this context, it is to express that someone wants or needs something. So subject + yao + object.
Victor: Simple as that!
Wrap-up
Amber: That just about does it for today.
Victor: Ready to test what you just learned?
Amber: Make this lesson's vocabulary stick by using lesson specific flashcards in the learning center.
Victor: There is a reason everyone uses flashcards...
Amber: They work...
Victor: They really do help memorization.
Amber: You can get the flashcards for this lesson at
Victor: ChineseClass101.com.
Amber: Okay....
Amber: Zai jian!
Victor: Zai jian!

11 Comments

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ChineseClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
Pinned Comment
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Where do you want to go when you arrive in China?

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Monday at 01:24 AM
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你好 robert groulx!


谢谢 for commenting. We are very happy to have you here. Let us know if you have any questions.


Kind regards,

雷文特 (Levente)

Team ChineseClass101.com

robert groulx
Sunday at 12:02 AM
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thank you for the lesson transcript


favorite phrase is 这是找你的钱.


robert

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Sunday at 12:08 AM
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Hi, Efrem,


Thank you for you posting in Chinese!

We usually say, 我想看(国庆大典),……

国庆大典: an event held on National Day


Cho

Team ChineseClass101.com

Efrem
Friday at 04:33 AM
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我想看国庆节,吃点心馒头等等.

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 03:14 AM
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Hi Fred,


So you like spicy food? That's great! We hope you get to try the Sichuan beef noodles soon!!!! :laughing:

It's too spicy for me, but my friends love it!!


Olivia

Team ChineseClass101.com

Fred
Monday at 03:10 AM
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我很想去四川吃很辣的牛肉面,看起来特别好吃!我喜欢吃海鲜和很辣的中国菜。I would very much like to go to Sichuan to eat very spicy beef noodles, they look especially delicious! I like to eat seafood and very spicy Chinese food.

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Friday at 05:41 PM
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Hi Hank,


Good observation!


There really isn't much difference between "中文", "汉语" and "华语". It is also true that "华语" is more widely used outside China. "华" emphasised more on the ethnicity and culture instead of nationality. Many people of Chinese origins but are citizens of other countries still refer to themselves as "华人".


Keep up the good work! :thumbsup:

Thank you:heart:


Han

Team ChineseClass101.com

Hank Hester
Saturday at 05:34 AM
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你好!I have a question about the different ways to say "the chinese language" in chinese. I'm finding all sorts of things out there on the web and am wondering if you guys could explain or point me towards an answer. I hear 中文 and 汉语 used a lot but are they interchangeable or is there a difference? I know 普通话 is used when you're in china to refer to mandarin (unless you're in Taiwan where it's 國語)but I read somewhere that most chinese people in foreign countries refer to it as 华语. 因为我住在美国,我应该怎么说 “中文” 跟中国人这儿?Translation (I hope): Since I live in the US, how should I say "Chinese" when talking to chinese people here?


P.S. I love Victor and Amber!! They make learning Chinese something I look forward too every day :smile:

ChineseClass101.com Verified
Tuesday at 12:21 PM
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Hi Khiem,


That's right!! Connecting a new word you learned with an image is a very effective learning method!:grin:


Keep it up!! And let us know if you have any questions.


Cheers,

Olivia

Team ChineseClass101.com

Khiem
Monday at 06:09 PM
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That's interesting! I knew 找 could mean "to find", but I didn't know it could also mean "change". I guess if I imagine a taxi driver trying to find some change, it will be easy to remember!