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Lesson Transcript

Taiwanese Mandarin Survival Phrases Lesson 2: You're Welcome!
In this lesson, you will learn how to say “you’re welcome” in formal and informal settings.
The phrase 不用謝(Bú yòng xiè) in Chinese is the most polite way to say “you’re welcome.”
Let’s break it down by tone:
First, we have 不(bù).
Next, we have 用(yòng). This is in fourth tone.
Last, we have 謝(xiè). This is in fourth tone.
Usually 不(bù) is in fourth tone. But because it is followed by 用(yòng), which is in fourth tone, it becomes second tone.
Now, let’s break it down by meaning:
不(bù) means "no."
用(yòng) means "to use."
謝(xiè) is “thank you.”
Literally, the phrase means “no need for thanks,” which can translate to “you’re welcome.”
Altogether we have 不用謝(bú yòng xiè).
Listen again, one more time, slowly:
[Slow] 不用謝(bú yòng xiè).
[Normal] 不用謝(bú yòng xiè).
A more casual way to say “you’re welcome” is 没事(Méi shì).
Let’s break it down by tone:
First is 没(méi). This is in second, rising tone.
Next is 事(shì). This is in fourth tone.
Now, let’s break it down by meaning:
没(méi) means "no" or "to not have."
事(shì) means "business" or "a thing like an action.”
Literally, the phrase means “no thing,” which can also mean “it’s nothing.”
Altogether we have 没事(Méi shì).
Listen again, one more time, slowly:
[Slow] 没事(Méi shì).
[Normal] 没事(Méi shì).
You can use this if someone asks you, “What’s wrong?” or if someone says “thank you” for something. In response, you can say 没事(Méi shì), “It’s nothing.”
Another way to say “You’re welcome,” is 不客氣(Bú kè qi).
This means “Don’t be polite.”
Let’s break this down by tone:
First, we have 不(bù).
Next, we have 客(kè). This is in fourth tone.
Last, we have 氣(qi). This has no tone.
Usually, 不(bù) is in fourth tone. But since it’s followed by another fourth tone, it becomes second tone.
Now let’s break it down by meaning:
不(bù) means "no."
客氣(kè qi) means "politeness" or "to be polite.”
The whole phrase means “There is no need to be polite.” You can use this when someone says “Thank you.”
Altogether, we have 不客氣(Bú kè qi).
Listen again, one more time, slowly:
[Slow] 不客氣(Bú kè qi).
[Normal] 不客氣(Bú kè qi).
These three forms of "You’re welcome" are used often.
For example, 没事(Méi shì) can be used when a friend says 謝謝 (Xiè xie), meaning “Thank you” .
If you are speaking to an older person, it’s better to say 不客氣(Bú kè qi)! or 不用謝(Bú yòng xiè)! These forms are more polite.

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ChineseClass101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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How often do you say “You are welcome?” We should have a poll!!!

ChineseClass101.com
Sunday at 06:27 PM
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Hi Daren,


Thank you for posting.


Please download the [Lesson Notes] pdf in the [Lesson Notes] section by clicking on {Download as PDF].


In the [SAMPLE SENTENCES] section of this pdf there are specific sample sentences for each lesson. For example, the sample sentences of lesson 2 (current one) are different from lesson 1.


Hope this helps! In case of any questions, please feel free to contact us.


Sincerely,

Cristiane

Team ChineseClass101.com

daren
Monday at 06:11 PM
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In the lesson script, sample sentences are the same for all lessons and they are irrelevant. I am very disappointed.😠