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Archive for the 'Chinese Culture' Category

How to Introduce Your Family in Chinese

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Almost everyone holds a special place in their heart for families. A family is those you’re bound with from birth, the ones who will always be there for you unconditionally. When we first meet someone, we like to be familiar with their family background. Knowing this provides valuable information on that person’s upbringing, which could shape their personality dramatically. Thus, it’s important to learn how to talk about your family in Chinese.

In China, family has great importance. 孝顺 (xiào shùn), which means being responsible and obedient to parents, is one of the best qualities a person can have. While reading this article, keep in mind that the Chinese view of parent-child relationships differs in some ways from that of Western countries.

Now let’s get right into today’s adventure!

Table of Contents

  1. Family Perceptions in China
  2. Family Member Terms and Other Basics
  3. Terms for Relatives
  4. Family Member Terms as a Married Person
  5. Endearment Terms
  6. Bonus - Interesting Expressions about Family Members
  7. Conclusion: How ChineseClass101 Can Help You Master Family Terms

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1. Family Perceptions in China

Parents Phrases

The family institution in China is incredibly strong. China highly values family bonds, particularly parent-child relationships. When it comes to family in the Chinese culture, there are even traditions that say children should never travel far, and should always stay with their parents.

Even now, many men still live with their parents even after their marriage. In this case, the woman will have to move to the man’s house and live with his parents. This sometimes creates an unpleasant relationship between the wife and her mother-in-law, which is a situation you can see used as a stereotype in a wide variety of Chinese shows.

There are many different ways to name family members depending on your relationship to them. Age difference is the main factor in determining what to call a family member, since Chinese people heavily emphasize that youngsters should respect their elders.

One thing to keep in mind: Unlike in Western culture, it’s not respectful to directly call elders by their names. This matter will be introduced more thoroughly later in this article.


2. Family Member Terms and Other Basics

Family Words

Here are some Chinese words for family members to expand your family in Chinese vocabulary! With just these basic words and phrases, you have a great place to start a simple conversation about family.

  • In Chinese: 家人
    Pinyin: jiā rén
    In English: family

    In Chinese: 我的家庭很幸福。
    Pinyin: Wǒ de jiā tíng hěn xìng fú.
    In English: I have a happy family.

    In Chinese: 我是在单亲家庭中长大的。
    Pinyin: Wǒ shì zài dān qīn jiā tíng zhōng zhǎng dà de.
    In English: I grew up in a single-parent family.

  • In Chinese: 母亲
    Pinyin: mǔ qīn
    In English: mother
  • In Chinese: 父亲
    Pinyin: fù qīn
    In English: father
  • In Chinese: 妈妈
    Pinyin: mā ma
    In English: mom
  • In Chinese: 爸爸
    Pinyin: bà ba
    In English: dad
  • In Chinese: 姐姐 / 妹妹
    Pinyin: jiě jie / mèi mei
    In English: (older) sister / (younger) sister

    In Chinese: 我有个[姐姐].
    Pinyin: Wǒ yǒu gè [jiě jie].
    In English: I have a(n) [older sister].

  • In Chinese: 哥哥/弟弟
    Pinyin: gē ge /dì di
    In English: (older) brother / (younger) brother
  • In Chinese: 兄弟姐妹
    Pinyin: xiōng dì jiě mèi
    In English: sibling

Fun fact: The interesting thing about siblings in Chinese is that older and younger siblings have different terms, whereas English does not.

  • In Chinese: 姥爷 / 爷爷 / 祖父
    Pinyin: lǎo yé / yé ye / zǔ fù
    In English: (mother’s side) grandfather / (father’s side) grandfather / grandfather
  • In Chinese: 姥姥 / 奶奶 / 祖母
    Pinyin: lǎo lao / nǎi nai / zǔ mǔ
    In English: (mother’s side) grandmother / (father’s side) grandmother / grandmother
  • In Chinese: 父母 / 家长
    Pinyin: fù mǔ / jiā zhǎng
    In English: parents

Fun fact: The literal meaning of 家长 is the family’s leader.

  • In Chinese: 祖父母
    Pinyin: zǔ fù mǔ
    In English: grandparents
  • In Chinese: 曾祖母
    Pinyin: zēng zǔ mǔ
    In English: great grandmother
  • In Chinese: 曾祖父
    Pinyin: zēng zǔ fù
    In English: great grandfather


3. Terms for Relatives

Family in Winter Clothes Outside
Who can say having a big family isn’t fun?

Now, let’s work our way around the Chinese family tree, so that you’ll never struggle to find the right word for a family member!

  • In Chinese: 亲戚/亲属
    Pinyin: qīn qi / qīn shǔ
    In English: relative

Fun fact: There’s a fun Chinese term called 走亲戚 (zǒu qīn qi), which literally means “walk through relatives.” This is a tradition that Chinese people normally have during Chinese New Year, which is also known as the Spring Festival. It’s a holiday where families spend time together and catch up, just like Christmas in Western cultures. If some families can’t make the reunion, you’ll need to 走亲戚, to visit them at their place and spend some quality time. This shows that the Chinese extended family is just as important as the Chinese immediate family.

  • In Chinese: 叔叔
    Pinyin: shū shu
    In English: uncle
  • In Chinese: 阿姨
    Pinyin: ā yí
    In English: aunt

Fun fact: In English, youngsters can usually call their elders who have no relations Mr. or Ms. and such, and sometimes if an elder is close enough, they can even directly call them by their names. This is quite different in China.

The young generation have to call adults who are older a certain term depending on the age difference. Usually, you can call people who are ten to twenty years older “aunt” (阿姨) or “uncle” (叔叔). For people who are at a similar age as your grandparents, you’re required to call them “grandmother” (奶奶) or “grandfather” (爷爷).

  • In Chinese: 堂兄弟姐妹/表兄弟姐妹
    Pinyin: táng xiōng dì jiě mèi /biǎo xiōng dì jiě mèi
    In English: cousin

Fun fact: Since “cousin” in Chinese is a relatively long word, Chinese people usually don’t use the word “cousin.” Instead, they’ll use the terms that can show the direct relation. There are eight different terms under the category “cousin,” including: 堂兄 (táng xiōng) [male, father’s side, older], 堂弟 (táng dì) [male, father’s side, younger], 堂姐 (táng jiě) [female, father’s side, older], 堂妹 (táng mèi) [female, father’s side, younger], 表兄 (biǎo xiōng) [male, mother’s side, older], 表弟 (biǎo dì) [male, mother’s side, younger], 表姐 (biǎo jiě) [female, mother’s side, older], 表妹 (biǎo mèi) [female, mother’s side, younger].

  • In Chinese: 外甥女 / 侄女
    Pinyin: wài shēng nǚ / zhí nǚ
    In English: niece
  • In Chinese: 侄子 / 外甥
    Pinyin: zhí zi / wài shēng
    In English: nephew


4. Family Member Terms as a Married Person

Once you’ve married in Chinese culture, you’ve gained several new Chinese family members. Here’s what to call them all!

  • In Chinese: 妻子
    Pinyin: qī zǐ
    In English: wife
  • In Chinese: 丈夫 / 先生
    Pinyin: zhàng fū / xiān shēng
    In English: husband

Family Smiling
I believe we all want a happy family!

  • In Chinese: 女儿
    Pinyin: nǚ ér
    In English: daughter
  • In Chinese: 儿子
    Pinyin: ér zi
    In English: son
  • In Chinese: 姐夫 / 妹夫
    Pinyin: jiě fū / mèi fū
    In English: brother-in-law
  • In Chinese: 嫂子 / 弟妹
    Pinyin: sǎo zi / dì mèi
    In English: (older brother’s side) sister-in-law / (younger brother’s side) sister-in-law
  • In Chinese: 婆婆 / 岳母
    Pinyin: pó po / yuè mǔ
    In English: mother-in-law (husband’s mother) / mother-in-law (wife’s mother)
  • In Chinese: 公公 / 岳父
    Pinyin: gōng gong / yuè fù
    In English: father-in-law (husband’s father) / father-in-law (wife’s father)

Fun fact: In Chinese culture, if you’re on good terms with your father-in-law and mother-in-law, and you feel comfortable, it will be good to call them “mom” or “dad,” just like your wife/husband does. This shows that you see them as your own mother or father. However, in many cases, it can be difficult to get along with your father-in-law or mother-in-law.


5. Endearment Terms

Family Walking by a Lake
Let’s use more endearment terms to call the ones you love!

  • In Chinese: 爹地 / 爸爸 / 老爸
    Pinyin: diē dì / bà ba / lǎo bà
    In English: daddy
  • In Chinese: 妈咪 / 妈妈 / 老妈
    Pinyin: mā mī / mā ma / lǎo mā
    In English: mommy
  • In Chinese: 老哥 / 老弟
    Pinyin: lǎo gē / lǎo dì
    In English: (older) brother / (younger) brother
  • In Chinese: 老姐 / 老妹
    Pinyin: lǎo jiě / lǎo mèi
    In English: (older) sister / (younger) sister
  • In Chinese: 老婆 / 媳妇
    Pinyin: lǎo pó / xí fù
    In English: wife
  • In Chinese: 老公
    Pinyin: lǎo gōng
    In English: husband

Elderly Person Lying in Bed

Fun fact: 老 means “old” in Chinese, which is a very common thing to call someone who is close to you in Chinese. If you notice, lots of the nicknames mentioned above begin with a 老. In this case, 婆 and 公 each means “old women” and “old men.” By calling your other half this, it shows your commitment that you want to grow old with each other.

  • In Chinese: 亲爱的
    Pinyin: qīn ài de
    In English: dear
  • In Chinese: 宝贝
    Pinyin: bǎo bèi
    In English: baby
  • In Chinese: 闺女
    Pinyin: guī nǚ
    In English: daughter


6. Bonus - Interesting Expressions about Family Members

Family Quotes

  • In Chinese: 虎毒不食子。
    Pinyin: Hǔ dú bú shí zǐ.
    In English: Even a vicious tiger won’t eat its own son.
    Actual meaning: Parents will always treat their own children kindly, no matter how evil their nature is.
  • In Chinese: 有其父必有其子。
    Pinyin: Yǒu qí fù bì yǒu qí zǐ.
    In English: Like father, like son.
    Actual meaning: A son’s character is very likely to resemble his father’s.
  • In Chinese: 不听老人言,吃亏在眼前。
    Pinyin: Bù tīng lǎo rén yán, chī kuī zài yǎn qián.
    In English: If you don’t listen to elders’ advice, you will learn your lesson.


7. Conclusion: How ChineseClass101 Can Help You Master Family Terms

I hope you’re now more fascinated with the unique Chinese culture after reading this article about Chinese family. Continue to binge on learning the most native and entertaining Chinese lessons at ChineseClass101.com; here, Chinese is no longer an excruciating language that’s hard to master. It’s a paradise where you can enjoy yourself even while studying!

Before you go, let us know in the comments how confident you feel naming your family members in Chinese now! And tell us common sayings or idioms about family in your own language while you’re at it! ;) We look forward to hearing from you!

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Dōngzhì Festival: Celebrate Winter Solstice in China

The Dōngzhì Festival in China, also called the Chinese Winter Solstice Festival, is one of the most important and popular holidays in China. Some argue it’s actually more important than the Chinese New Year!

In this article, you’ll learn about Chinese Winter Solstice traditions and why this holiday was significant in the past.

Are you ready? Let’s get started!

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1. What is the Winter Solstice?

Essentially, the Chinese Winter Solstice is a time to prepare for the New Year and spend time with family and loved ones.

In Chinese tradition, there’s a saying that says Winter Solstice is more important than the Lunar New Year. That is because ancient China was an agricultural community, and cultivation had to be done according to the season.

Why do the Chinese celebrate the Winter Solstice?

Chinese people observed astronomy and the laws of nature, and found that the Winter Solstice is the shortest day of the year. After that day, the daytime gradually becomes longer, and spring comes as winter fades away. Hence, the start of a new year actually starts on Winter Solstice instead of the Lunar New Year.

As a matter of fact, in the past, Winter Solstice was said to have been New Year’s Day. No wonder that in the south of the Yangtze River, there’s a saying: “You will be one year older after having the Winter Solstice dinner.”

2. When is the Dōngzhì Festival?

Frosty Winter Scene

Each year, the Winter Solstice occurs somewhere between December 21 and 23.

3. How the Chinese Celebrate Winter Solstice

Family Getting Together

1- Chinese Winter Solstice Traditional Food

Okay, so first things first: What do people eat on Winter Solstice?

People in the North eat dumplings during the Winter Solstice. Dumplings are a very popular folk food with a long history in China. There’s a saying that “there is no better food than dumplings.”

In many places, there’s a custom of eating lamb during the Winter Solstice Festival. Since China enters its coldest time after Winter Solstice, traditional Chinese doctors regard lamb as a food that can help people tonify Yang (an aphrodisiac effect) and make the body strong.

Eating Tangyuan is another traditional custom for Winter Solstice and is particularly popular in southern China. Tangyuan is also called Tangtuan (gnocchi) or Tuanzi (dumpling) and is a dessert made from glutinous rice flour. The character yuan (round) indicates reunion and that something is perfectly successful. There’s a saying among the people that “you will be one year older once you eat Tangyuan.”

2- Counting Nine

There’s also the custom of “counting nine.” In the lunar calendar, ancient Chinese people created a way to count days in winter: starting from the Winter Solstice day that begins with the “first nine,” to the “ninth nine.” There’s an old saying: “During the time of the first and second nine, you don’t put your hands out of your coat; on the third and fourth nine, you can skate on the ice…” Finally, after eighty-one days, the cold winter is gone.

4. Dumplings and Frostbite

During the Chinese Winter Solstice, dumplings are a longtime favorite food! Do you know why the custom of eating dumplings was handed down in northern China?

Eating dumplings during the Winter Solstice Festival is to commemorate an ancient doctor named Zhang Zhongjing, who is thought to have invented dumplings. Because the dumpling soup he made had successfully cured the frostbitten ears of many people, a saying was born: “If you don’t eat dumplings at Winter Solstice, your ear will be frostbitten.”

5. Must-Know Vocabulary for the Chinese Winter Solstice

Glutinous Rice Ball

Here’s the essential Chinese vocabulary you should know for the Chinese Winter Solstice!

  • 馄饨 (húntun) — Wonton dumpling
  • 冬天 (dōngtiān) — Winter
  • 合家团聚 (héjiā tuánjù) — Family reunion
  • 糯米团子 (nuòmǐ tuánzi) — Glutinous rice ball
  • 桂花酒酿圆子 (guìhuā jiǔniàng yuánzǐ) — Glutinous rice balls in sweet osmanthus and glutinous rice wine
  • 和家人吃冬至团圆饭 (hé jiārén chī dōngzhì tuányuánfàn) — Have dinner with family on Winter Solstice evening
  • 午夜阳光 (wǔyè yángguāng) — Midnight sun
  • 极夜 (jí yè) — Polar night
  • 冬至 (Dōng Zhì) — Winter Solstice Festival
  • 冬至大如年 (Dōng Zhì dà rú nián) — Winter Solstice is more important than Chinese New Year

To hear the pronunciation of each vocabulary word, and to read them alongside relevant images, be sure to check out our Chinese Winter Solstice vocabulary list!

Final Thoughts

What are your thoughts on the Chinese Winter Solstice holiday? Are there any special winter-related holidays in your country? Let us know about them in the comments!

Chinese culture is so rich and full. If you’re interested in learning more about China and her people, or if you want more wintery Chinese words, you may find the following pages useful:

Learning Chinese doesn’t have to be boring or overwhelming—with ChineseClass101.com, it can even be fun! If you’re serious about improving your Chinese, create your free lifetime account today!

Happy Chinese learning, and stay warm out there! :)

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How to Celebrate Single’s Day in China: You’re not alone!

Holidays are one of the most essential embodiments of a region’s culture. Some traditional holidays have brewed throughout history, while some modern holidays are indicating the new emerging facets of culture. If you’re a Chinese language learner, you must have heard of some traditional Chinese holidays such as the Chinese New Year. However, today we’re going to introduce an off-the-beaten-path holiday called Singles’ Day.

What? You’ve only heard of Valentine’s Day? Well, now you’re going to open your eyes. China’s Singles’ Day became a fad in recent years, originally in an attempt to celebrate single people. Now, it has evolved into a big shopping holiday.

Want to know more about it? No problem. We’ve got everything you need here about China’s Singles’ Day!

Tired of Being Jealous of People Who Can Celebrate Valentine’s Day? Now It’s You Single People’s Turn!

1. How Did Singles’ Day Start?

Singles’ Day in Chinese is 光棍节 (guāng gùn jié), which literally means “single stick day.” It’s a single-awareness day among young Chinese people. This non-official national Singles’ Day originated from college students at Nanjing University in 1993 in an attempt to celebrate their pride in singledom as opposed to being part of a couple on Valentine’s Day.

So when is Chinese Singles’ Day? Because the date 11/11 resembles four single sticks that indicate being solitary, November 11th was agreed to be the proper Singles’ Day.

Interestingly, it has become trendy for many young people to confess their feelings for people they like on Singles’ Day! Guess why? Because if it ever works out, then they can finally end their journey of being single exactly on Singles’ Day and start a romantic date right after!

Binge-shopping on Singles’ Day!

2. How Did it Become a Shopping Festival?

Singles’ Day has now been transformed from an “anti-Valentine’s Day” into the biggest online shopping day worldwide. This idea was triggered by Alibaba back in 2009 and people have embraced it ever since. The Chinese Singles’ Day Alibaba paved the way for also encourages single people’s inner pride by providing them with such perks.

A version of Alibaba’s Singles’ Day, also known as the Double Eleven Shopping Day, was created by offering prodigious discounts for twenty-four hours mainly through Alibaba-operated platforms such as Taobao, as well as some other big competitors that integrated Alibaba’s idea. It’s much like American’s Black Friday, but the Singles’ Day shopping festival is more E-commerce-focused and has a larger scale due to the huge Chinese population.

Now you know why many people can’t wait for the exciting Double Eleven Shopping Day to clean their cart and buy all of their favorite products they’ve been waiting a long time for! If you ever want to get these good deals on China’s Singles’ Day, remember to have some good Wi-Fi service and try to get your desired items exactly at the time the sale starts. Otherwise, your website may crash due to the large demand and you’ll end up getting nothing!

3. Singles’ Day Vocabulary

1- Words about Relationships

Single dog - 单身狗 (dān shēn gǒu)

Meaning: Someone who is single and sad
Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我今年还是一只单身狗。
Pinyin: Wǒ jīn nián hái shì yī zhī dān shēn gǒu.
In English: I am still a single dog this year.

A single noble - 单身贵族 (dān shēn guì zú)

Meaning: Someone who is single and proud
Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我想一直做个单身贵族,无拘无束。
Pinyin: Wǒ xiǎng yī zhí zuò gè dān shēn guì zú, wú jū wú shù.
In English: I just wanted to be a single noble all the time and keep myself free.

Single stick - 光棍 (guāng gùn)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我已经做了快二十年的光棍,真希望可以快点找到自己的另一半。
Pinyin: Wǒ yǐ jīng zuò le kuài èr shí nián de guāng gùn, zhēn xī wàng kě yǐ kuài diǎn zhǎo dào zì jǐ de lìng yī bàn.
In English: I have been a single stick for almost twenty years; I really hope to find my other half as soon as possible.

Not single anymore - 脱单 (tuō dān)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 今年的我终于不用再过光棍节了,因为我已经脱单啦!
Pinyin: Jīn nián de wǒ zhōng yú bú yòng zài guò guāng gùn jié le, yīn wèi wǒ yǐ jīng tuō dān la!
In English: Finally, I won’t have to go through Singles’ Day this year, because I am not single anymore!

Wine Toast

Public display of affection (PDA) - 秀恩爱 (xiù ēn ài)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我朋友总是在公共场合秀恩爱。
Pinyin: Wǒ péng yǒu zǒng shì zài gōng gòng chǎng hé xiù ēn ài.
In English: My friend always likes to show public displays of affection.

Eat dog food - 吃狗粮 (chī gǒu liáng)

Meaning: A single person who suffers from other people’s public displays of affection.
Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 看来我今年情人节又要吃狗粮了。
Pinyin: Kàn lái wǒ jīn nián qíng rén jié yòu yào chī gǒu liáng le.
In English: It seems like I will have to eat dog food again on this year’s Valentine’s Day.

2- Chinese Singles’ Day Shopping Vocabulary

Sign up - 注册 (zhù cè)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我刚刚注册了一个淘宝的账号。
Pinyin: Wǒ gāng gāng zhù cè le yī gè táo bǎo de zhàng hào.
In English: I just signed up for an account on Taobao.

Coupon - 优惠券 (yōu huì quàn)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我终于领到了优惠券,可以用来买我购物车里的东西。
Pinyin: Wǒ zhōng yú lǐng dào le yōu huì quàn, kě yǐ yòng lái mǎi wǒ gòu wù chē lǐ de dōng xi.
In English: I finally got coupons, which I can use to buy the products in my shopping cart.

Aren’t Sales the Best Things Ever?

Sale - 促销 (cù xiāo)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 每次我都会等到商场大促销再去购物。
Pinyin: Měi cì wǒ dōu huì děng dào shāng chǎng dà cù xiāo zài qù gòu wù.
In English: I always wait to shop until there is a big sale in the mall.

Online shopping - 网上购物 (wǎng shàng gòu wù)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 网上购物真方便。
Pinyin: Wǎng shàng gòu wù zhēn fāng biàn.
In English: Online shopping is so convenient.

Double Eleven Shopping Day (11/11 Shopping Day) - 双十一购物节 (shuāng shí yī gòu wù jié)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我打算等到了双十一购物节再买购物车里的这些东西。
Pinyin: Wǒ dǎ suàn děng dào le shuāng shí yī gòu wù jiē zài mǎi gòu wù chē lǐ de zhè xiē dōng xi.
In English: I am going to wait to clear my cart until Double Eleven Shopping Day.

The same style as internet celebrities’ - 网红同款 (wǎng hóng tóng kuǎn)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我们店有很多网红同款的宝贝。
Pinyin: Wǒ men diàn yǒu hěn duō wǎng hóng tóng kuǎn de bǎo bèi.
In English: Lots of products in our store are in the same style as internet celebrities’.

Shipping fees included - 包邮 (bāo yóu)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 每个人都很享受买东西包邮这项服务。
Pinyin: Měi gè rén dōu hěn xiǎng shòu mǎi dōng xi bāo yóu zhè xiàng fú wù.
In English: Everyone enjoys free shipping when they buy something.

Remember to Give Your Seller a Thumbs-Up If You Are Happy with Your Purchase.

Positive feedback - 好评 (hǎo píng)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 如果您对我们的服务满意的话,请给我们一个好评吧。
Pinyin: Rú guǒ nín duì wǒ men de fú wù mǎn yì de huà, qǐng gěi wǒ men yī gè hǎo píng ba.
In English: If you are happy with our service, please give us positive feedback.

Negative feedback - 差评 (chà píng)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我刚从这家店买的东西,几天就坏了,于是我毫不犹豫地给了他们一个差评。
Pinyin: Wǒ gāng cóng zhè jiā diàn mǎi de dōng xi, jǐ tiān jiù huài le, yú shì wǒ háo bù yóu yù de gěi le tā men yī gè chà píng.
In English: I just bought a product from this store, and it broke within just a couple of days. Thus I gave them negative feedback without any hesitance.

Store - 店铺 (diàn pù)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 这家护肤品店铺的宝贝又便宜又好用。
Pinyin: Zhè jiā hù fū pǐn diàn pù de bǎo bèi yòu pián yí yòu hǎo yòng.
In English: The skincare products from this store are inexpensive and of good quality.

Limited to one store only - 独家 (dú jiā)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 这件衣服是我们店独家设计的。
Pinyin: Zhè jiàn yī fú shì wǒ men diàn dú jiā shè jì de.
In English: The design of this piece of clothing is limited to our store only.

New arrival - 新品 (xīn pǐn)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 听说这家店会在今年双十一上很多新品呢。
Pinyin: Tīng shuō zhè jiā diàn huì zài jīn nián shuāng shí yī shàng hěn duō xīn pǐn ne.
In English: I heard that this store will have many new arrivals on 11/11 this year.

Products - 宝贝 (bǎo bèi)

Usage in a sentence:
In Chinese: 我们家的宝贝质量都很好。
Pinyin: Wǒ men jiā de bǎo bèi zhì liàng dōu hěn hǎo.
In English: All the products in our store have great quality.

Conclusion

Now that you have a good understanding of China’s Singles’ Day, whether you’re single or not, remember to take advantage of it to get a good deal on this special shopping day! Are there any products or items you’ve been wanting to buy? Now’s the time!

We also have free Chinese lessons released every week so that you can have a free try! What are you waiting for? Study now on ChineseClass101.com with the most updated and culturally relevant lessons, and the most knowledgeable and energetic hosts, to have the experience of a lifetime!

How To Post In Perfect Chinese on Social Media

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You’re learning to speak Chinese, and it’s going well. Your confidence is growing! So much so that you feel ready to share your experiences on social media—in Chinese.

At Learn Chinese, we make this easy for you to get it right the first time. Post like a boss with these phrases and guidelines, and get to practice your Chinese in the process.

Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Chinese

1. Talking about Your Restaurant Visit in Chinese

Eating out is fun, and often an experience you’d like to share. Take a pic, and start a conversation on social media in Chinese. Your friend will be amazed by your language skills…and perhaps your taste in restaurants!

xué yǒu eats at a restaurant with his friends, posts an image of the food, and leaves this comment:

POST

Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

超级美味的全聚德烤鸭! (Chāojí měiwèi de Quánjùdé kǎoyā !)
“Super delicious Quanjude Peking Roast Duck!”

1- 超级美味的 (chāojí měiwèi de )

First is an expression meaning “super delicious.”
This expression is used to describe tasty food in an exaggerated way. “超级” means “super,” which indicates degree. Exaggerated language is often used on social media platforms to express the speaker’s emotions.

2- 全聚德烤鸭 (Quánjùdé kǎoyā )

Then comes the phrase - “Quanjude Peking Roast Duck.”
Peking duck is a famous dish from Beijing that has been served since the imperial era. This dish is highly prized for the duck’s crispy skin. Quanjude Peking Roast Duck is the most authentic version of Peking duck. A main feature of Quanjude Peking Roast Duck is its slicing in front of the diners.

COMMENTS

In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

1- 好香呀! (Hǎo xiāng ya !)

His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Smells delicious!”
Use this expression to make conversation by agreeing with the poster about the food.

2- 我也要去吃! (Wǒ yě yào qù chī !)

His girlfriend’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “I have to go as well!”
Use this expression to indicate that you would like to have the same experience as the poster.

3- 这么肥,小心! (Zhème féi , xiǎoxīn !)

His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “So fattening, be careful!”
Use this expression to show you are feeling concerned for the poster’s weight. In Asian countries, weight issues are discussed openly, and it’s not uncustomary for friends and family to tell you to your face that you’re getting fat!

4- 环境好吗? (Huánjìng hǎo mɑ ?)

His girlfriend, jìng, uses an expression meaning - “Is the setting any good?”
Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the restaurant’s atmosphere.

VOCABULARY

Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 烤鸭 (kǎoyā ): “roast duck”
  • 香 (xiāng ): “delicious”
  • 肥 (féi ): “fattening”
  • 小心 (xiǎoxīn ): “careful”
  • 好 (hǎo ): “good”
  • 环境 (huánjìng ): “settings”
  • 超级 (chāojí ): “super”
  • So, let’s practice a bit. If a friend posted something about having dinner with friends, which phrase would you use?

    Now go visit a Chinese restaurant, and wow the staff with your language skills!

    2. Post about Your Mall Visit in Chinese

    Another super topic for social media is shopping—everybody does it, everybody loves it, and your friends on social media are probably curious about your shopping sprees! Share these Chinese phrases in posts when you visit a mall.

    jìng shops with her sister at the mall, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    好久没血拼了。 (Hǎojiǔ méi xuè pīn le。)
    “I haven’t gone shopping in a long time.”

    1- 好久 (hǎojiǔ )

    First is an expression meaning “in a long time.”
    “好久” is a compound word. “好” is commonly used in Chinese to indicate degree, similar to the English word “very”. It can be used to modify adjectives such as big, beautiful, and delicious.

    2- 没血拼了 (méi xuè pīn le)

    Then comes the phrase - “I haven’t gone shopping.”
    “血拼” is commonly used on social media platforms and means “going on a shopping spree”. People of urban China love shopping as well as posting their shopping photos on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 这是在哪儿? (Zhè shì zài nǎr?)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s location.

    2- 鞋子好漂亮! (Xiézi hǎo piàoliang!)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Those shoes are so pretty!”
    Use this expression to make conversation and comment on the shoes in the poster’s photo.

    3- 美女! (Měinǚ!)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Hi there, gorgeous!”
    Use this to make conversation by greeting the poster with a term that compliments her on her looks.

    4- 折扣真心不错! (Zhékòu zhēnxīn bùcuò!)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Great discounts!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling optimistic about the price of merchandise.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 好久 (hǎojiǔ ): “in a long time”
  • 血拼 (xuè pīn ): “go shopping”
  • 美女 (měinǚ): “gorgeous”
  • 鞋子 (xiézi): “shoes”
  • 漂亮 (piàoliang): “pretty”
  • 折扣 (zhékòu ): “discount”
  • 真心不错 (zhēnxīn bùcuò): “great”
  • So, if a friend posted something about going shopping, which phrase would you use?

    3. Talking about a Sport Day in Chinese

    Sports events, whether you’re the spectator or the sports person, offer fantastic opportunities for great social media posts. Learn some handy phrases and vocabulary to start a sport-on-the-beach conversation in Chinese.

    xué yǒu plays with his friends at the beach, posts an image of the team, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    我们战无不胜! (Wǒmen zhànwúbùshèng!)
    “We’re invincible!”

    1- 我们 (wǒmen)

    First is an expression meaning “we.”
    Chinese love team sports and often shout slogans such as “we are the champion(我们必胜)”, “Come on! Come on!(加油!加油!)” while watching sporting events.

    2- 战无不胜 (zhànwúbùshèng)

    Then comes the phrase - “invincible.”
    A double negative is used in “战无不胜” for emphasis. Many Chinese like to watch sporting events, especially soccer games. When Italy won the 2006 FIFA World Cup Final, one of China’s most famous football commentators became hysterical and completely forgot he was doing a show. He was then dubbed as Italy’s most loyal fan.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 加油! (Jiāyóu !)

    His girlfriend, jìng, uses an expression meaning - “Come on!”
    Use this expression to be enthusiastic and supportive.

    2- 我支持你! (Wǒ zhīchí nǐ !)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “I’m rooting for you!”
    Use this expression to be supportive, in an enthusiastic way.

    3- 为什么不叫我? (Wèishénme bù jiào wǒ ?)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Why didn’t you ask me?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling somewhat excluded.

    4- 这不算什么! (Zhè bù suàn shénme !)

    His girlfriend’s nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “This is nothing!”
    Use this expression if you wish to tease the poster with a humorous insult.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 战无不胜 (zhànwúbùshèng): “invincible”
  • 加油 (jiāyóu): “come on”
  • 支持 (zhīchí ): “root for”
  • 为什么 (Wèishénme): “why”
  • 叫 (jiào): “ask”
  • 不算什么 (bù suàn shénme): “nothing”
  • 我们 (wǒmen): “we”
  • Which phrase would you use if a friend posted something about sports?

    But sport is not the only thing you can play! Play some music, and share it on social media.

    4. Share a Song on Social Media in Chinese

    Music is the language of the soul, they say. So, don’t hold back—share what touches your soul with your friends!

    jìng shares a song she just heard at a party, posts an image of the artist, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    分享一首老歌。 (Fēnxiǎng yī shǒu lǎo gē 。)
    “Sharing an old song.”

    1- 分享 (fēnxiǎng)

    First is an expression meaning “share.”
    “分享” means “sharing something”. Chinese like to share their favorite books, songs and movies on social media platforms because it’s similar to sharing their emotions.

    2- 一首老歌 (yī shǒu lǎo gē)

    Then comes the phrase - “an old song.”
    “一首” is a compound word that consists of a numeral and a classifier/measure word. Classifiers/measure words are frequently used in the Chinese language when a noun is quantified by a numeral. Normally, it is necessary to insert a classifier between the numeral and the noun when a phrase like “one song” is translated into Chinese. The Chinese equivalent for “one song” is “一首歌”, where “一” means “one”, “歌” means “song”, and “首” is the required classifier. The 1990s was the golden age of Chinese pop music. Many excellent musicians, singers and music pieces came from that period. Much of today’s youth still enjoys songs from that period.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 有点伤感。 (Yǒudiǎn shānggǎn 。)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Sounds a bit sad.”
    Use this expression to indicate how the song makes you feel.

    2- 喜欢歌词。 (Xǐhuān gēcí 。)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “I like the lyrics.”
    Use this expression to indicate your preference.

    3- 好像是一个电影的插曲。 (Hǎoxiàng shì yī gè diànyǐng de chāqǔ 。)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Seems like a movie soundtrack.”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    4- 真老土! (Zhēn lǎo tǔ !)

    Her nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “Really old-fashioned!”
    Use this expression if you think the song is dated.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 老歌 (lǎo gē ): “old song”
  • 有点 (yǒudiǎn): “a bit”
  • 伤感 (shānggǎn): “sad”
  • 喜欢 (xǐhuān): “like”
  • 电影 (diànyǐng): “movie”
  • 分享 (fēnxiǎng): “share”
  • 老土 (lǎo tǔ): “old-fashioned”
  • Which song would you share? And what would you say to a friend who posted something about sharing music or videos?

    Now you know how to start a conversation about a song or a video on social media!

    5. Chinese Social Media Comments about a Concert

    Still on the theme of music—visiting live concerts and shows just have to be shared with your friends. Here are some handy phrases and vocab to wow your followers with in Chinese!

    xué yǒu goes to a concert, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    一年一度的草原音乐节,超赞! (Yī nián yī dù de cǎoyuán yīnyuè jié , chāo zàn !)
    “The annual Grasslands Music Festival, fabulous!”

    1- 一年一度的草原音乐节 (yī nián yī dù de cǎoyuán yīnyuè jié)

    First is an expression meaning “the annual Grasslands Music Festival.”
    The Zhang Bei Grasslands Music Festival, also known as the InMusic Festival, is the largest and arguably the most entertaining music festival in China. Singers and audience members of this festival are known to build close connections with each other and the beautiful scenery that surrounds them. This festival is named “green” due to its location.

    2- 超赞 (chāo zàn )

    Then comes the phrase - “fabulous.”
    This expression is used to describe something that is particularly good. It is commonly used on social media platforms but is rarely used in everyday conversation.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 真棒! (Zhēn bàng !)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Awesome!”
    Use this expression when you’re agreeing with the poster and are feeling excited.

    2- 很壮观。 (Hěn zhuàngguān 。)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Very spectacular.”
    Use this expression to show you too are feeling positive about the festival.

    3- 人好多呀! (Rén hǎoduō ya !)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Very crowded!”
    Use this expression to give a personal opinion about the festival.

    4- 真羡慕! (Zhēn xiànmù !)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “I’m so jealous!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling envious.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 音乐节 (yīnyuè jié): “music festival”
  • 超赞 (chāo zàn): “fabulous”
  • 真棒 (zhēn bàng ): “awesome”
  • 好 (hǎo): “very”
  • 壮观 (zhuàngguān): “spectacular”
  • 一年一度 (yī nián yī dù): “annual”
  • 羡慕 (xiànmù ): “jealous”
  • If a friend posted something about a concert , which phrase would you use?

    6. Talking about an Unfortunate Accident in Chinese

    Oh dear. You broke something by accident. Use these Chinese phrases to start a thread on social media. Or maybe just to let your friends know why you are not contacting them!

    jìng accidentally breaks her mobile phone, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    我把手机摔坏了,真倒霉! (Wǒ bǎ shǒujī shuāi huài le , zhēn dǎoméi !)
    “I broke my cell phone. What bad luck!”

    1- 我把手机摔坏了 (wǒ bǎ shǒujī shuāi huài le)

    First is an expression meaning “I broke my cell phone.”
    把 is a Chinese grammatical construction. In this construction, the functional word “把” is placed before the object of a verb, and the object is placed before the verb. This construction indicates that an action is done to the object by the subject.

    2- 真倒霉 (zhēn dǎoméi)

    Then comes the phrase - “What bad luck.”
    This expression is commonly used to indicate that something bad happened.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 怎么回事? (Zěnme huí shì ?)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “What happened?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious and would like to know more details.

    2- 现在的手机都很容易坏! (Xiànzài de shǒujī dōu hěn róngyì huài !)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Cell phones break easily these days!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling pessimistic.

    3- 刚好换个新的! (Gānghǎo huàn gè xīn de !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “It’s time to get a new one!”
    Use this expression to make conversation.

    4- 我很同情你。 (Wǒ hěn tóngqíng nǐ 。)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “I feel sorry for you.”
    Use this expression if you are feeling sympathy for the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 手机 (shǒujī ): “cellphone”
  • 你 (nǐ ): “you”
  • 容易 (róngyì ): “easily”
  • 摔坏 (shuāi huài ): “break”
  • 新 (xīn ): “new”
  • 同情 (tóngqíng ): “feel sorry for”
  • 坏 (huài ): “broken”
  • If a friend posted something about having broken something by accident, which phrase would you use?

    So, now you know how to describe an accident in Chinese. Well done!

    7. Chat about Your Boredom on Social Media in Chinese

    Sometimes, we’re just bored with how life goes. And to alleviate the boredom, we write about it on social media. Add some excitement to your posts by addressing your friends and followers in Chinese!

    xué yǒu gets bored at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    好无聊呀!谁能帮帮我? (Hǎo wúliáo ya ! Shéi néng bāng bāng wǒ ?)
    “So boring! Will someone help me?”

    1- 好无聊呀 (hǎo wúliáo ya)

    First is an expression meaning “so boring.”
    People often use this expression when they have nothing to do. It often implies that he/she wants someone to talk to or that he/she needs advice from someone on what to do.

    2- 谁能帮帮我 (shéi néng bāng bāng wǒ)

    Then comes the phrase - “will someone help me.”
    Duplications like “帮帮” are common in Chinese. Words or phrases are repeated to produce a modified meaning. Classifiers can be repeated to indicate “every”. For example, “个个都聪明” means “every one of them is clever”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 一个人多清净。 (Yī gè rén duō qīngjìng 。)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Nothing beats peace and quiet.”
    Use this expression if you’re of the opinion that the poster shouldn’t complain about having nothing to do.

    2- 请我吃饭! (Qǐng wǒ chīfàn !)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Take me out to dinner!”
    Use this expression to be funny but also offer a solution.

    3- 去踢足球,或者去游泳。 (Qù tī zúqiú , huòzhě qù yóuyǒng 。)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Play soccer, or go swimming.”
    Use this phrase to give suggestions.

    4- 我也是一样。 (Wǒ yěshì yīyàng 。)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Same here.”
    Use this expression to indicate that you’re in a similar situation as the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 无聊 (wúliáo ): “boring”
  • 帮 (bāng ): “help”
  • 饭 (fàn ): “dinner”
  • 足球 (zúqiú ): “soccer”
  • 或者 (huòzhě ): “or”
  • 一样 (yīyàng ): “same”
  • 去游泳 (qù yóuyǒng ): “go swimming”
  • If a friend posted something about being bored, which phrase would you use?

    Still bored? Share another feeling and see if you can start a conversation!

    8. Exhausted? Share It on Social Media in Chinese

    Sitting in public transport after work, feeling like chatting online? Well, converse in Chinese about how you feel, and let your friends join in!

    jìng feels exhausted after a long day at work, posts an image of herself looking tired, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    累死了!连饭都不想吃! (Lèi sǐ le ! Lián fàn dōu bùxiǎng chī !)
    “Exhausted! I don’t even want to eat!”

    1- 累死了 (lèi sǐ le )

    First is an expression meaning “exhausted.”
    “死了” usually follows adjectives with negative connotations to exaggerate the degree of how bad something is. In recent years, however, “死了” has also been added to adjectives with positive connotations to indicate a higher degree. For instance, 可爱死了 so lovely, 开心死了 so happy, etc.

    2- 连饭都不想吃 (lián fàn dōu bùxiǎng chī)

    Then comes the phrase - “I don’t even want to eat.”
    “连… 都…” is used to introduce an element that is to be emphasized, mostly unexpected or surprising events or information. It can be used in the same manner as “even”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 你应该换个工作。 (Nǐ yīnggāi huàn gè gōngzuò 。)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “You should get a new job.”
    Use this expression to offer a suggestion to the poster.

    2- 做个按摩! (Zuò gè ànmó !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Get a massage!”
    Use this expression to make a positive suggestion.

    3- 挺住! (Tǐng zhù !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Hang in there!”
    Use this expression to be supportive.

    4- 早休息吧。 (Zǎo xiūxi ba 。)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Have an early night.”
    Use this expression to show you are caring.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 累 (lèi ): “exhausted”
  • 应该 (yīnggāi ): “should”
  • 工作 (gōngzuò ): “job”
  • 按摩 (ànmó ): “massage”
  • 挺住 (tǐng zhù ): “hang in there”
  • 早休息 (zǎo xiūxi): “have an early night”
  • 吃 (chī ): “eat”
  • If a friend posted something about being exhausted, which phrase would you use?

    Now you know how to say you’re exhausted in Chinese! Well done.

    9. Talking about an Injury in Chinese

    So life happens, and you manage to hurt yourself during a soccer game. Very Tweet-worthy! Here’s how to do it in Chinese.

    xué yǒu suffers a painful injury, posts an image of his leg, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    打篮球摔伤了腿,真命苦! (Dǎ lánqiú shuāi shāng le tuǐ , zhēn mìng kǔ !)
    “I hurt my leg while playing basketball. So unlucky!”

    1- 打篮球摔伤了腿 (dǎ lánqiú shuāi shāng le tuǐ)

    First is an expression meaning “I hurt my leg while playing basketball.”
    “摔伤” is a complementary phrase. The two kinds of complementary phrases are verb-complement phrases and adjective-complement phrases. A verb-complement phrase consists of a verb and a complement. For example, 看清楚 see clearly(看 is the verb and 清楚 is the complement).

    2- 真命苦 ( zhēn mìng kǔ)

    Then comes the phrase - “so unlucky.”
    “真命苦” is commonly used in oral expressions and means very unlucky.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 怎么这么不小心! (Zěnme zhème bù xiǎoxīn!)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “So careless!”
    Use this expression to criticise the poster for hurting themselves.

    2- 严重吗? (Yánzhòng mɑ ?)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Is it serious?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling worried and concerned.

    3- 祝你早日康复! (Zhù nǐ zǎorì kāngfù !)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Get better soon!”
    Use this expression if you are feeling warmhearted and wish the poster a speedy recovery.

    4- 好可怜。 (Hǎo kělián 。)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Poor thing.”
    Use this expression to show you are sympathetic.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 篮球 (lánqiú ): “basketball”
  • 命苦 (mìng kǔ ): “unlucky”
  • 腿 (tuǐ ): “leg”
  • 不小心 (bù xiǎoxīn ): “careless”
  • 严重 (yánzhòng ): “serious”
  • 早日 (zǎorì): “soon”
  • 可怜 (kělián ): “poor”
  • If a friend posted something about being injured, which phrase would you use?

    We love to share our fortunes and misfortunes; somehow that makes us feel connected to others.

    10. Starting a Conversation Feeling Disappointed in Chinese

    Sometimes things don’t go the way we planned. Share your disappointment about this with your friends!

    jìng feels disappointed about today’s weather, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    又是雾霾天!还怎么出门! (Yòu shì wùmái tiān ! Hái zěnme chūmén !)
    “Smoggy day again! How could I possibly go out!”

    1- 又是雾霾天 (yòu shì wùmái tiān)

    First is an expression meaning “smoggy day again.”
    Nowadays, people often talk about smoggy days because pollution is becoming a serious issue in China, especially in the northern cities.

    2- 还怎么出门 (hái zěnme chūmén)

    Then comes the phrase - “how could I possibly go out.”
    “怎么” is an interrogative pronoun. Pronouns can replace nouns, verbs, adjectives, numerals, and adverbs and can be classified as personal pronouns, demonstrative pronouns, or interrogative pronouns. Personal pronouns are used to replace people or things. Demonstrative pronouns are used to distinguish people or things. And interrogative pronouns are used to ask questions.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 污染越来越严重! (Wūrǎn yuè lái yuè yánzhòng !)

    Her supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Pollution is becoming more and more serious!”
    Use this expression to agree with the poster by giving a personal opinion.

    2- 戴口罩! (Dài kǒuzhào !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Wear a mask!”
    Use this expression to make a suggestion.

    3- 远离城市。 (Yuǎnlí chéngshì 。)

    Her boyfriend’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Get away from the city.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling pessimistic too, and make a suggestion.

    4- 天气真糟糕!可怕! (Tiānqì zhēn zāogāo ! Kěpà !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Such terrible weather! Horrible!”
    This is another expression indicating that you strongly agree with the poster about the weather.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 雾霾 (wùmái ): “smoggy”
  • 出门 (chūmén ): “go out”
  • 污染 (wūrǎn ): “pollution”
  • 口罩 (kǒuzhào ): “mask”
  • 远离 (yuǎnlí ): “get away from”
  • 城市 (chéngshì ): “city”
  • 可怕 (kěpà ): “horrible”
  • How would you comment in Chinese when a friend is disappointed?

    Not all posts need to be about a negative feeling, though!

    11. Talking about Your Relationship Status in Chinese

    Don’t just change your relationship status in Settings, talk about it!

    xué yǒu changes his status to “In a relationship”, posts an image of him and his girlfriend, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    太激动了,我恋爱了! (Tài jīdòng le , wǒ liàn’ài le !)
    “So excited. I’m in love!”

    1- 太激动了 (tài jīdòng le)

    First is an expression meaning “so excited.”
    “太激动了” is used when the speaker is excited about something.

    2- 我恋爱了 (wǒ liàn’ài le)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m in love.”
    In China, people usually express their love in a subtle way. However, nowadays, younger people are becoming more open and direct and tend to show their love boldly, like on social media.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 祝福你们! (Zhùfú nǐmen !)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “You have my blessing!”
    Use this blessing to show you are feeling warmhearted and positive about the relationship.

    2- 真的假的? (Zhēn de jiǎ de ?)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “For real?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, but probably positive about the announcement.

    3- 可爱的女孩。 (Kě’ài de nǚhái 。)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Lovely girl.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling appreciative of the poster’s choice in women.

    4- 简直是个奇迹! (Jiǎnzhí shì gè qíjì !)

    His girlfriend’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a miracle!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 激动 (jīdòng ): “excited”
  • 恋爱 (liàn’ài ): “be in love”
  • 你们 (nǐmen ): “you”
  • 女孩 (nǚhái ): “girl”
  • 可爱 (kě’ài ): “lovely”
  • 奇迹 (qíjì ): “miracle”
  • 真的 (zhēn de ): “real”
  • What would you say in Chinese when a friend changes their relationship status?

    Being in a good relationship with someone special is good news - don’t be shy to spread it!

    12. Post about Getting Married in Chinese

    Wow, so things got serious, and you’re getting married. Congratulations! Or, your friend is getting married, so talk about this in Chinese.

    jìng is getting married today, so she leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    我是世界上最幸福的人。我们结婚了! (Wǒ shì shìjiè shàng zuì xìngfú de rén 。 Wǒmen jiéhūn le !)
    “I am the happiest person in the world. We got married!”

    1- 我是世界上最幸福的人 (wǒ shì shìjiè shàng zuì xìngfú de rén)

    First is an expression meaning “I am the happiest person in the world.”
    In China, people often use this phrase to express their happiness, especially after they tie the knot.

    2- 我们结婚了 (wǒmen jiéhūn le)

    Then comes the phrase - “we got married.”
    “了” indicates the realization or completion of an action. For instance, 我写了两封信 (I wrote two letters).

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 恭喜恭喜! (Gōngxǐ gōngxǐ !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Congratulations!”
    This is the traditional response to this kind of news.

    2- 你今天最美! (Nǐ jīntiān zuì měi !)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “You look your best today!”
    Use this phrase to compliment the bride on her appearance.

    3- 他才是最幸福的人。 (Tā cái shì zuì xìngfú de rén 。)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “He’s the happiest person.”
    Use this expression to compliment the bride on who she is, meaning the bridegroom is lucky to have landed a bride like her.

    4- 郎才女貌。 (Lángcáinǚmào 。)

    Her supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Perfect match.”
    Use this statement to indicate what you think of the match.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 世界 (shìjiè ): “world”
  • 最幸福 (zuì xìngfú ): “happiest”
  • 结婚 (jiéhūn ): “get married”
  • 恭喜 (gōngxǐ ): “congratulations”
  • 他 (tā ): “he”
  • 人 (rén ): “person”
  • 今天 (jīntiān ): “today”
  • How would you respond in Chinese to a friend’s post about getting married?

    For the next topic, fast forward about a year into the future after the marriage…

    13. Announcing Big News in Chinese

    Wow, huge stuff is happening in your life! Announce it in Chinese.

    xué yǒu finds out he and his wife are going to have a baby, posts an image of the two of them, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    重大消息!我要有宝宝了! (Zhòngdà xiāoxi ! Wǒ yào yǒu bǎobao le !)
    “Big news! I’m having a baby!”

    1- 重大消息 (zhòngdà xiāoxi)

    First is an expression meaning “big news.”
    “重大消息” is often placed in front of an important message to draw people’s attention. This message can be either a good thing or a bad thing, but in most cases it’s good.

    2- 我要有宝宝了 (wǒ yào yǒu bǎobao le)

    Then comes the phrase - “I’m having a baby.”
    The adverb “要” and the modal particle “了” are used to describe an action that will happen in the future. The adverb “要” functions as an adverbial adjunct. For instance, 我要睡觉了 (I’m going to bed).

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 你终于要做爸爸了! (Nǐ zhōngyú yào zuò bàba le !)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “You’re finally going to be a father!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling excited and happy for the poster.

    2- 起好名字了吗? (Qǐ hǎo míngzi le mɑ ?)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Have you picked a name yet?”
    Use this phrase to make conversation by asking a question.

    3- 真是个好消息! (Zhēn shì gè hǎo xiāoxi !)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “What great news!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling optimistic about the news.

    4- 我要做哥哥了,哈! (Wǒ yào zuò gēge le , hā !)

    His nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “I’m going to be a big brother, ha!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 重大 (zhòngdà ): “big”
  • 消息 (xiāoxi ): “news”
  • 宝宝 (bǎobao ): “baby”
  • 终于 (zhōngyú ): “finally”
  • 名字 (míngzi): “name”
  • 哥哥 (gēge ): “big brother”
  • 爸爸 (bàba ): “father”
  • Which phrase would you choose when a friend announces their pregnancy on social media?

    So, talking about a pregnancy will get you a lot of traction on social media. But wait till you see the responses to babies!

    14. Posting Chinese Comments about Your Baby

    Your bundle of joy is here, and you cannot keep quiet about it! Share your thoughts in Chinese.

    jìng plays with her baby, posts an image of the little one, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    我的萌宝宝还知道对着镜头笑呢! (Wǒ de méng bǎobao hái zhīdào duì zhe jìngtóu xiào ne !)
    “My adorable baby even knows to smile at the camera!”

    1- 我的萌宝宝 (wǒ de méng bǎobao)

    First is an expression meaning “my adorable baby.”
    Chinese people often use the word “萌” on social media platform to express that someone or something is very cute. For example, 这只小狗很萌 (This puppy is so cute).

    2- 还知道对着镜头笑呢 (hái zhīdào duì zhe jìngtóu xiào ne)

    Then comes the phrase - “even knows to smile at the camera.”
    In China, younger parents like to share their baby’s photos on social media. Some parents even update the photos every day to record their baby’s development.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 好可爱! (Hǎo kěài !)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “So cute!”
    Use this expression if you think the baby is adorable.

    2- 真想捏捏她的小脸。 (Zhēn xiǎng niē nie tā de xiǎoliǎn 。)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Really want to squeeze her little face.”
    Use this expression to be affectionate.

    3- 笑得真坏。 (Xiào de zhēn huài 。)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Such a wicked grin.”
    This is a humorous expression to indicate that you like the baby’s smile.

    4- 超级宝宝! (Chāojí bǎobao !)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Super baby!”
    Use this expression to show your enthusiastic, positive feelings about the baby.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 萌 (méng ): “adorable”
  • 镜头 (jìngtóu ): “camera”
  • 笑 (xiào ): “smile”
  • 对着 (duì zhe): “at”
  • 超级 (chāojí ): “super”
  • 脸 (liǎn ): “face”
  • 捏 (niē ): “squeeze”
  • If your friend is the mother or father, which phrase would you use on social media?

    Congratulations, you know the basics of chatting about a baby in Chinese! But we’re not done with families yet…

    15. Chinese Comments about a Family Reunion

    Family reunions - some you love, some you hate. Share about it on your feed.

    xué yǒu goes to a family gathering, posts an image of the group, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    温馨时刻,一家人,一顿大餐 (Wēnxīn shíkè , yī jiā rén , yī dùn dàcān)
    “Warm moments, the whole family, a big meal.”

    1- 温馨时刻 (wēnxīn shíkè)

    First is an expression meaning “warm moments.”
    “…时刻” is often used on social media to indicate a very special moment.

    2- 一家人,一顿大餐 (yī jiā rén , yī dùn dàcān)

    Then comes the phrase - “the whole family, a big meal.”
    “大餐” means “big meal”. Chinese people enjoy having big meals during get-togethers.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 直流口水! (Zhí liú kǒushuǐ !)

    His wife’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Mouth watering!”
    Use this expression to comment on the food.

    2- 真是热闹。 (Zhēn shì rènao 。)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “So lively.”
    Use this phrase to describe the family, if you perceive them to be energetic.

    3- 酒喝得不少吧? (Jiǔ hē de bù shǎo ba ?)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “You drank a lot, didn’t you?”
    Use this expression to make fun of the poster’s drinking habits.

    4- 可惜没有我。 (Kěxī méi yǒu wǒ 。)

    His nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “Too bad I wasn’t there.”
    Use this expression to show you are regretful for not having attended.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 温馨 (wēnxīn ): “warm”
  • 时刻 (shíkè ): “moment”
  • 餐 (cān ): “meal”
  • 一家人 (yī jiā rén ): “the whole family”
  • 一 (yī ): “a”
  • 不少 (bù shǎo ): “a lot”
  • 可惜 (kěxī ): “too bad”
  • Which phrase is your favorite to comment on a friend’s photo about a family reunion?

    16. Post about Your Travel Plans in Chinese

    So, the family are going on holiday. Do you know how to post and leave comments in Chinese about being at the airport, waiting for a flight?

    jìng waits at the airport for her flight, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    一个人的旅行,出发了! (Yī gè rén de lǚxíng , chūfā le !)
    “One man’s journey. Get going!”

    1- 一个人的旅行 (yī gè rén de lǚxíng)

    First is an expression meaning “one man’s journey.”
    “一个人的旅行” indicates that someone is traveling alone. This phrase refers to “a journey of self-discovery” and is a kind of literary expression.

    2- 出发了 (chūfā le )

    Then comes the phrase - “get going.”
    This expression means “starting a journey” and is commonly used when someone is heading for a new place.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 去哪里玩? (Qù nǎlǐ wán ?)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Where are you heading?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the poster’s holiday destination.

    2- 带好吃的回来! (Dài hǎochī de huílái !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Bring me some treats!”
    Use this expression if you want the poster to bring you gifts.

    3- 一路顺风。 (Yīlù shùnfēng 。)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Bon voyage.”
    This is a loan-expression from French, which means “Travel well!” It is often used in other languages.

    4- 注意安全哦。 (Zhùyì ānquán o 。)

    Her husband, xué yǒu, uses an expression meaning - “Be safe.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling concerned and wish the poster well.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 旅行 (lǚxíng ): “journey”
  • 出发 (chūfā ): “get going”
  • 哪里 (nǎlǐ ): “where”
  • 好吃的 (hǎochī de ): “treats”
  • 一路顺风 (yīlù shùnfēng): “bon voyage”
  • 一个人的 (yī gè rén de): “one man’s”
  • 安全 (ānquán ): “safe”
  • Choose and memorize your best airport phrase in Chinese!

    Hopefully the rest of the trip is better!

    17. Posting about an Interesting Find in Chinese

    So maybe you’re strolling around at your local market, and find something interesting. Here are some handy Chinese phrases!

    xué yǒu finds an unusual item at a local market, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    刚淘到的好东西。让你们开开眼! (Gāng táo dào de hǎo dōngxi 。 Ràng nǐmen kāi kāi yǎn !)
    “Just got some great stuff. Behold!”

    1- 刚淘到的好东西 (gāng táo dào de hǎo dōngxi)

    First is an expression meaning “just got some great stuff.”
    “淘到的” is used to indicate that a person bought something. This phrase should be followed by a noun such as a dress, a bag, etc.

    2- 让你们开开眼 (ràng nǐmen kāi kāi yǎn )

    Then comes the phrase - “behold.”
    This expression is used to show off something you have. It indicates that you want admiration.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 什么宝贝? (Shénme bǎobei ?)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “What did you get?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious about the purchase.

    2- 你好厉害! (Nǐ hǎo lìhai !)

    His wife’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Impressive!”
    Use this expression if you’re impressed with the poster’s purchase.

    3- 真精致。一定价值不菲吧? (Zhēn jīngzhì 。 Yī dìng jiàzhí bùfěi ba ?)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Really exquisite. Must’ve cost a fortune, right?”
    Use these phrases to make conversation by giving a personal opinion, and asking a question too.

    4- 是要送给我的吧? (Shì yào sòng gěi wǒ de ba ?)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “A present for me, right?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling playful.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 刚 (gāng ): “just”
  • 淘到 (táo dào ): “get”
  • 东西 (dōngxi ): “stuff”
  • 什么 (shénme ): “what”
  • 厉害 (lìhai): “impressive”
  • 价值不菲 (jiàzhí bùfěi): “cost a fortune”
  • 精致 (jīngzhì ): “exquisite”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s interesting find?

    Perhaps you will even learn the identity of your find! Or perhaps you’re on holiday, and visiting interesting places…

    18. Post about a Sightseeing Trip in Chinese

    Let your friends know what you’re up to in Chinese, especially when visiting a remarkable place! Don’t forget the photo.

    jìng visits a famous landmark, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    登顶长城。感觉就是不一样! (Dēng dǐng Cháng chéng 。 Gǎnjué jiù shì bù yīyàng !)
    “Reached the top of the Great Wall. Feels great!”

    1- 登顶长城 (dēng dǐng Cháng chéng)

    First is an expression meaning “reached the top of the Great Wall.”
    The Great Wall is one of the largest construction projects ever completed. The wall is constructed of masonry, rocks and packed-earth and stretches 4,160 miles across North China.

    2- 感觉就是不一样 (gǎnjué jiù shì bù yīyàng)

    Then comes the phrase - “feels great.”
    This expression is used when someone feels good about something, but it can also be used to describe a place, an activity, etc.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 真壮观! (Zhēn zhuàngguān !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Really spectacular!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling in awe.

    2- 看上去风好大。 (Kàn shàng qù fēng hǎo dà 。)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Looks so windy.”
    Share this phrase as a personal opinion.

    3- 我很久没有去长城了! (Wǒ hěn jiǔ méi yǒu qù Cháng chéng le !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “I haven’t been to the Great Wall for a long time!”
    This comment is another phrase to use if you want to make conversation by sharing a personal detail.

    4- 哪一个? (Nǎ yī gè ?)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Which one?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and you wish to tease the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 长城 (Cháng chéng ): “the Great Wall”
  • 感觉 (gǎnjué ): “feel”
  • 一个 (yī gè ): “one”
  • 看上去 (kàn shàng qù ): “look”
  • 顶 (dǐng ): “top”
  • 哪 (nǎ ): “which”
  • 登 (dēng ): “reach”
  • Which phrase would you prefer when a friend posts about a famous landmark?

    Share your special places with the world. Or simply post about your relaxing experiences.

    19. Post about Relaxing Somewhere in Chinese

    So you’re doing nothing yet you enjoy that too? Tell your social media friends about it in Chinese!

    xué yǒu relaxes at a beautiful place, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    晒一下我的休闲天堂,美妙绝伦。 (Shài yī xià wǒ de xiūxián tiāntáng , měimiào juélún 。)
    “Check out my paradise, truly exceptional.”

    1- 晒一下我的休闲天堂 (shài yī xià wǒ de xiūxián tiāntáng)

    First is an expression meaning “check out my paradise.”
    “晒一下” means “check out something” and is often used on social media platforms. For instance, 晒一下我的新鞋 (check out my new shoes).

    2- 美妙绝伦 (měimiào juélún)

    Then comes the phrase - “truly exceptional.”
    “美妙绝伦” is an example of Chengyu. Chengyu are a type of traditional Chinese idiomatic expression, most of which consist of four characters. Chengyu were widely used in Classical Chinese and are still common in written and spoken Chinese today.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 真的需要定期放松。 (Zhēn de xūyào dìngqī fàngsōng 。)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.”
    Use this expression to be old fashioned.

    2- 突然觉得自己很累。 (Tūrán juéde zìjǐ hěn lèi 。)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Suddenly, I feel so worn out.”
    Use this expression to share how the image makes you feel.

    3- 简直是世外桃园! (Jiǎnzhí shì shìwài táoyuán !)

    His wife’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “True Shangri-la!”
    Use this expression to share a personal opinion.

    4- 亲近自然。 (Qīnjìn zìrán 。)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Connect with nature.”
    This is another observation about the post and image - a good way to stay part of the conversation.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 晒一下 (shài yī xià ): “check out”
  • 休闲 (xiūxián ): “leisure”
  • 天堂 (tiāntáng ): “paradise”
  • 美妙绝伦 (měimiào juélún): “truly exceptional”
  • 突然 (tūrán ): “suddenly”
  • 自然 (zìrán ): “nature”
  • 世外桃源 (shìwài táoyuán): “Shangri-la”
  • Which phrase would you use to comment on a friend’s feed?

    The break was great, but now it’s time to return home.

    20. What to Say in Chinese When You’re Home Again

    And you’re back! What will you share with friends and followers?

    jìng returns home after a vacation, posts an image of herself at home, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    没办法,该回到现实了! (Méi bànfa , gāi huídào xiànshí le !)
    “Nothing left to be done; time to go back to reality!”

    1- 没办法 (méi bànfa )

    First is an expression meaning “nothing left to be done.”
    This expression is used to indicate your unwillingness to do something.

    2- 该回到现实了 (gāi huídào xiànshí le)

    Then comes the phrase - “time to go back to reality.”
    “回到现实” means “getting back into your usual routine”.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 悠长假期。一定玩痛快了吧! (Yōucháng jiàqī 。 Yīdìng wán tòngkuài le ba !)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “A long vacation. You must have enjoyed yourself!”
    Use this comment to be part of the conversation.

    2- 都晒黑了! (Dōu shài hēi le !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “You got tanned!”
    Use this expression to comment on the poster’s tan.

    3- 有没有礼物给我? (Yǒu méi yǒu lǐwù gěi wǒ ?)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Any gifts for me?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous, and want gifts from the poster.

    4- 离开了这么久。 (Líkāi le zhème jiǔ 。)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “You’ve been gone so long.”
    Use this expression to partake in the conversation with a general comment about their long holiday.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 回到 (huídào ): “go back”
  • 悠长 (yōucháng ): “long”
  • 假期 (jiàqī ): “vacation”
  • 现实 (xiànshí ): “reality”
  • 黑 (hēi ): “tanned”
  • 礼物 (lǐwù ): “gift”
  • 这么 (zhème ): “so”
  • How would you welcome a friend back from a trip?

    What do you post on social media during a public commemoration day such as the Chinese Lantern Festival?

    21. It’s Time to Celebrate in Chinese

    It’s an historic day and you wish to post something about it on social media. What would you say?

    xué yǒu appreciates the lanterns with his wife, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    我在跟老婆一起赏花灯,真浪漫! (Wǒ zài gēn lǎopó yīqǐ shǎng huādēng , zhēn làngmàn !)
    “I’m appreciating the lanterns with my wife; so romantic!”

    1- 我在跟老婆一起赏花灯 (wǒ zài gēn lǎopó yīqǐ shǎng huādēng)

    First is an expression meaning “I am appreciating the lanterns with my wife.”
    The Chinese Lantern Festival is celebrated on the fifteenth day of the first month in the lunar calendar. This festival marks the end of the Chinese New Year celebrations. According to the folk custom of China, on that night people celebrate the festival by appreciating the lanterns, guessing riddles written on the lanterns, and eating rice balls.

    2- 真浪漫 (zhēn làngmàn)

    Then comes the phrase - “so romantic.”
    People light up fancy lanterns on the night of the Lantern Festival and consider the event to be quite romantic.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 这么巧。我也在赏花灯! (Zhème qiǎo 。 Wǒ yě zài shǎng huādēng !)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “What a coincidence. I’m appreciating the lanterns as well!”
    Use this expression if you are doing the same as the poster, probably at the same time.

    2- 恩爱的一对儿! (Ēn’ài de yī duìr !)

    His wife’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Lovebirds!”
    Use this expression to comment on the romance.

    3- 有没有猜灯谜? (Yǒu méi yǒu cāi dēngmí ?)

    His nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “Have you tried guessing the riddles written on the lanterns?”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling curious.

    4- 元宵节快乐! (Yuánxiāo jié kuàilè !)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Lantern Festival!”
    This is a common greeting and wish for this time of year in China.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 花灯 (huādēng ): “lantern”
  • 赏 (shǎng ): “appreciate”
  • 猜 (cāi ): “guess”
  • 浪漫 (làngmàn ): “romantic”
  • 灯谜 (dēngmí ): “riddles written on lanterns”
  • 元宵节 (Yuánxiāo jié ): “the Lantern Festival”
  • 跟…一起 (gēn … yīqǐ ): “with”
  • If a friend posted something about a holiday, which phrase would you use?

    The Chinese Lantern Festival and other public commemoration days are not the only special ones to remember!

    22. Posting about a Birthday on Social Media in Chinese

    Your friend or you are celebrating your birthday in an unexpected way. Be sure to share this on social media!

    jìng goes to her birthday party, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    天啊!感谢大家给我的惊喜! (Tiān a ! Gǎnxiè dàjiā gěi wǒ de jīngxǐ !)
    “Oh, my god! Thank you all for throwing me a surprise party!”

    1- 天啊 (tiān a)

    First is an expression meaning “Oh, my god.”
    “天啊” can be used when you are surprised.

    2- 感谢大家给我的惊喜 (gǎnxiè dàjiā gěi wǒ de jīngxǐ )

    Then comes the phrase - “thank you all for throwing me a surprise party.”
    Chinese birthday traditions reflect the culture’s deep-seated focus on longevity. Typically, people eat Longevity Noodles during birthday celebrations.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 生日快乐! (Shēngrì kuàilè !)

    Her neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “Happy Birthday!”
    This is the traditional birthday wish in Chinese.

    2- 好大的蛋糕! (Hǎo dà de dàngāo !)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “This cake is huge!”
    This comment shows that you are in awe of the size of the cake.

    3- 一定收到很多礼物。 (Yīdìng shōu dào hěn duō lǐwù 。)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “I bet you received a lot of presents.”
    Use this phrase to be humorous and make conversation.

    4- 又长了一岁。 (Yòu zhǎng le yī suì 。)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “One year older.”
    Use this expression to comment on the poster’s age.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 大家 (dàjiā ): “you all”
  • 感谢 (gǎnxiè ): “thank”
  • 好大的 (hǎo dà de ): “huge”
  • 生日 (shēngrì ): “birthday”
  • 蛋糕 (dàngāo ): “cake”
  • 收到 (shōu dào ): “receive”
  • 天啊 (tiān a): “Oh, my god”
  • If a friend posted something about birthday greetings, which phrase would you use?

    23. Talking about New Year on Social Media in Chinese

    Impress your friends with your Chinese New Year’s wishes this year. Learn the phrases easily!

    xué yǒu celebrates the New Year, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    新年快乐!恭喜发财! (Xīnnián kuàilè ! Gōngxǐ fācái !)
    “Happy New Year! May you be happy and prosperous!”

    1- 新年快乐 (xīnnián kuàilè )

    First is an expression meaning “Happy New Year.”
    “新年快乐” is one of the most commonly used New Year’s greetings. “新年” can be replaced with other festivals. For instance, 中秋快乐 Happy Mid-Autumn Festival.

    2- 恭喜发财 (gōngxǐ fācái)

    Then comes the phrase - “May you be happy and prosperous.”
    Chinese people often bless each other via social media during New Year’s. “恭喜发财” is another commonly used New Year’s greeting.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 祝你万事如意! (Zhù nǐ wànshì rúyì !)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “All the best to you!”
    Use this expression as a warmhearted response to the poster’s wish.

    2- 年年有余! (Niánnián yǒuyú !)

    His supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “May there be surpluses every year!”
    This is another positive wish for the new year ahead, indicating abundance.

    3- 红包拿来! (Hóngbāo ná lái !)

    His nephew, xiǎo míng, uses an expression meaning - “Give me my red envelope!”
    Use this expression to comment on an old custom.

    4- 下周我们聚聚! (Xiàzhōu wǒmen jù jù!)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “We can get together sometime next week!”
    Ask this question if you’re keen to meet up with the poster.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 新年 (xīnnián ): “New Year”
  • 快乐 (kuàilè ): “happy”
  • 发财 (fācái ): “be surpluses”
  • 我们 (wǒmen ): “we”
  • 红包 (hóngbāo ): “red envelope”
  • 下周 (xiàzhōu ): “next week”
  • 聚聚 (jù jù): “get together”
  • Which is your favorite phrase to post on social media during New Year?

    But before New Year’s Day comes another important day…

    24. What to Post on Christmas Day in Chinese

    What will you say in Chinese about Christmas?

    jìng celebrates Christmas with her family, posts an image of it, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down jìng’s post.

    转眼又是一年。圣诞快乐! (Zhuǎnyǎn yòu shì yī nián 。 Shèngdàn kuàilè !)
    “Another year has gone by in the blink of an eye. Merry Christmas!”

    1- 转眼又是一年 (zhuǎnyǎn yòu shì yī nián)

    First is an expression meaning “another year has gone by in the twinkling of an eye.”
    This expression is used when someone thinks that time has gone by quickly. “Another year” can be replaced with “another week”, “another month”, etc.

    2- 圣诞快乐 (shèngdàn kuàilè )

    Then comes the phrase - “Merry Christmas.”
    There are not many Christians in China, but celebrating Christmas has become increasingly popular. Many customs, such as exchanging gifts, are similar to Western celebrations. In large cities, there are commercial Christmas decorations, signs, and items displayed during December.

    COMMENTS

    In response, jìng’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 漂亮的雪景! (Piàoliàng de xuějǐng !)

    Her husband’s high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “Beautiful snow!”
    This phrase is a comment on the weather, in particular, snow.

    2- 可惜我在南方,看不到雪。 (Kěxī wǒ zài nánfāng , kàn bù dào xuě 。)

    Her high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “It’s a pity that I can’t see snow here in the south.”
    This is a conversation-filler, also commenting on the snow, or lack thereof.

    3- 谁能陪我一起过? (Shéi néng péi wǒ yīqǐ guò ?)

    Her college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Who wants to celebrate Christmas with me?”
    Ask this question as a way to keep the conversation going.

    4- 同乐同乐! (Tóng lè tóng lè !)

    Her supervisor, zhì qiáng, uses an expression meaning - “Let’s celebrate together!”
    Make this suggestion if you wish to join the poster for Christmas celebrations.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 转眼 (zhuǎnyǎn ): “in the twinkling of an eye”
  • 同 (tóng ): “together”
  • 圣诞 (shèngdàn ): “Christmas”
  • 雪景 (xuějǐng ): “snow”
  • 漂亮 (piàoliàng ): “beautiful”
  • 南方 (nánfāng ): “south”
  • 谁 (shéi ): “who”
  • If a friend posted something about Christmas greetings, which phrase would you use?

    So, the festive season is over! Yet, there will always be other days, besides a birthday, to wish someone well.

    25. Post about Your Anniversary in Chinese

    Some things deserve to be celebrated, like wedding anniversaries. Learn which Chinese phrases are meaningful and best suited for this purpose!

    xué yǒu celebrates his wedding anniversary with his wife, posts an image of the two of them together, and leaves this comment:

    POST

    Let’s break down xué yǒu’s post.

    有了这么好的妻子,我欲何求。 (Yǒu le zhème hǎo de qīzi , wǒ yù hé qiú 。)
    “Having such a good wife, I shall not want.”

    1- 有了这么好的妻子 (yǒu le zhème hǎo de qīzi )

    First is an expression meaning “having such a good wife.”
    Depending on the context, different terms can be used to address wives in the Chinese language. For instance, 老婆 (colloquial), 夫人 (formal), 贱内 (classical).

    2- 我欲何求 (wǒ yù hé qiú )

    Then comes the phrase - “I shall not want.”
    This is quoted from Classical Chinese poetry. It means that you have the best and therefore want nothing more.

    COMMENTS

    In response, xué yǒu’s friends leave some comments.

    1- 好感动! (Hǎo gǎndòng !)

    His high school friend, lì, uses an expression meaning - “So touching!”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling emotionally touched by the image.

    2- 替你们感到高兴。 (Tì nǐmen gǎndào gāoxìng 。)

    His neighbor, ruò lán, uses an expression meaning - “I feel happy for you.”
    Use this expression to show you have positive feelings about the marriage and anniversary.

    3- 甜言蜜语总是对的。 (Tiányán mìyǔ zǒng shì duì de 。)

    His college friend, tāo, uses an expression meaning - “Sweet talk is always welcomed.”
    Use this expression to show you are feeling frivolous and wish to joke around a bit with the poster.

    4- 要有实际行动! (Yào yǒu shíjì xíngdòng !)

    His wife’s high school friend, xīn xīn, uses an expression meaning - “Actions speak louder than words!”
    Use this expression to be funny.

    VOCABULARY

    Find below the key vocabulary for this lesson:

  • 妻子 (qīzi ): “wife”
  • 有 (yǒu ): “have”
  • 求 (qiú ): “want”
  • 甜言蜜语 (tiányán mìyǔ ): “sweet talk”
  • 行动 (xíngdòng ): “action”
  • 总是 (zǒng shì ): “always”
  • 我 (wǒ ): “I”
  • If a friend posted something about Anniversary greetings, which phrase would you use?

    Conclusion

    Learning to speak a new language will always be easier once you know key phrases that everybody uses. These would include commonly used expressions for congratulations and best wishes, etc.

    Master these in fun ways with Learn Chinese! We offer a variety of tools to individualize your learning experience, including using cell phone apps, audiobooks, iBooks and many more. Never wonder again what to say on social media!

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Chinese

    How to Apologize in Chinese like a Native

    If you’ve just started learning Chinese, you may have wondered at some point, “How do I say sorry in Chinese?” Indeed, it’s vital to learn how to say sorry in Chinese culture, and any culture for that matter. We’re all human, and we all tend to make mistakes in the long journey of life, both small and large, and a fitting apology is almost always desired afterwards. This is when we need to say the “magic word” to make everything right again. Apologizing is the key to harmony in a relationship, as it can help you move past many unnecessary conflicts and misunderstandings.

    There are different ways of how to say sorry in the Chinese language. As a language learner who just set sail for Chinese, this article will help you get a sense of the unique way native Chinese people apologize. After you master the art of apologizing in Chinese with this article, you’ll never have to worry about not knowing what to say when you make forgivable mistakes! What are you waiting for? Let’s delve into how to give an apology in Chinese Mandarin. Start with a bonus, and download your FREE cheat sheet - How to Improve Your Chinese Skills! (Logged-In Member Only)

    1. The Most Important Apologizing Words
    2. How to Take the Blame
    3. Expressions for Formal and Business Situations
    4. Condolences
    5. Other Expressions
    6. How to respond
    7. Conclusion

    Log in to Download Your Free Cheat Sheet - Beginner Vocabulary in Chinese


    1. The Most Important Apologizing Words

    First things first! Here are some of the most common ways to apologize in Chinese, with some grammar explanations to make things clearer for you. This includes how to say “sorry” and “excuse me” in Chinese, which are two phrases you definitely will want to know!

    • In Chinese: 对不起。
      Pinyin: dui bu qǐ
      In English: Sorry

    The origin of this phrase is very interesting. Ancient Chinese people liked to showcase their knowledge by using couplets, which is a traditional form of art in the Chinese language. However, it’s often difficult to complete the pair. So, in order to express that they weren’t as knowledgeable as the person they were speaking to, people would say 对不起, which meant they weren’t able to complete the couplet. Later, it spread and become a popular way to apologize.

    Now, you can use 对不起 for a simple sincere apology. But keep in mind that it also indicates that you owe someone for what you did, so be careful when you use it, as it can be seen as a strong word. It’s best suited for an occasion where you feel the need to own up to your mistake and desire forgiveness in return. To make it even more formal, you can add the subjective and objective, such as in: 我对不起你 (wǒ duì bu qǐ nǐ), meaning “I am sorry to you.”

    • In Chinese: 抱歉。
      Pinyin: bào qiàn
      In English: I am sorry (I hold my apology).

    Compared to 对不起, 抱歉 is a lighter way to say I’m sorry in Chinese than the degree of apology that 对不起 entails. If there’s something you strongly feel sorry about and you feel desperate to express your apology, don’t use 抱歉 as it’s not sufficient to express your emotion in this context. 抱 literally means “hold,” and 歉 means “apology.” The whole word conveys a sense of guilt and regret, so if you ever feel bad about something and want to express it, this word is a good fit.

    • In Chinese: 不好意思。
      Pinyin: bù hǎo yì sī
      In English: Excuse me.

    The literal meaning of 不好意思 is “feeling embarrassed or shy,” which indicates an even lighter degree of apology compared to 抱歉. For things that aren’t as significant or that you don’t personally feel extremely bad about, feel free to use this phrase to politely show your apology for the little inconvenience you caused, such as being late.

    Sometimes Chinese people also use it for expressing their shy or awkward feelings. For example, when people feel too flattered and thus are embarrassed by a compliment, they might say 你说的我都不好意思了(nǐ shuō de wǒ dōu bù hǎo yì sī le), meaning “You are making me feel embarrassed.”

    Additional note: You can also add 真 before any of the three phrases above. It means “really,” which adds a sincerity to the apology.


    2. How to Take the Blame

    • In Chinese: 我错了。
      Pinyin: wǒ cuò le
      In English: It is my fault.

    This can be used both seriously and casually. In a serious situation, it emphasizes the fact that you’re willing to admit your mistakes. You can also repeat it to comfort someone who’s unsatisfied or irritated by something trivial you did, usually with people you’re close with.

    • In Chinese: 是我不好。
      Pinyin: shì wǒ bù hǎo
      In English: It is my bad.

    You can bravely admit your mistake by saying this. This is a neutral expression as well, which suits both serious and casual situations. You may want to add 原谅我吧 (yuán liàng wǒ ba), meaning “please forgive me,” right after to make your apology sound more genuine.

    • In Chinese: 责任全在我/是我的责任。
      Pinyin: zé rèn quán zài wǒ /shì wǒ de zé rèn
      In English: All the responsibility lies on me/It is all my responsibility.

    This is a powerful expression for owning up to all the responsibility for something you’ve done. Essentially, this puts all of the blame on yourself.

    • In Chinese: 要怪就怪我吧。
      Pinyin: yào guài jiù guài wǒ ba
      In English: If you have to blame someone, blame me.

    If there’s an embarrassing situation where someone has to own up to his/her mistake for the sake of a group, and you want to be the one who takes the fall, this is the right phrase to use. Usually, you need to add some good explanation right after in order to support the reason why you should be the one to take the blame. It’s sometimes good to be the one who admits the mistake, because everyone else may dearly appreciate your sacrifice for turning the embarrassment into a better atmosphere.


    3. Expressions for Formal and Business Situations

    3 Ways to Say Sorry

    You’ll find this section extremely helpful and relevant if you’ve ever wondered how to say phrases like “Sorry I’m late,” in Chinese. Let’s take a look at the most common formal and business Chinese apologies.

    • In Chinese: 抱歉/不好意思/对不起,麻烦你了。
      Pinyin: bào qiàn / bù hǎo yì sī / duì bu qǐmá fán nǐ le
      In English: I am sorry to trouble you.
    • In Chinese: 抱歉/不好意思/对不起,我今天不能去了。
      Pinyin: bào qiàn / bù hǎo yì sī / duì bu qǐ, wǒ jīn tiān bú néng qù le
      In English: I am sorry that I won’t make it today.
    • In Chinese: 抱歉/不好意思/对不起,我要先走一步。
      Pinyin: bào qiàn / bù hǎo yì sī / duì bu qǐ, wǒ yào xiān zǒu yī bù
      In English: Sorry, I have to go.
    • In Chinese: 抱歉/不好意思/对不起,我来晚了。
      Pinyin: bào qiàn / bù hǎo yì sī / duì bu qǐ, wǒ lái wǎn le
      In English: Sorry that I am late.
    • In Chinese: 不好意思/抱歉,借过一下可以吗?
      Pinyin: bú hǎo yì sī / bào qiàn,jiè guò yī xià kě yǐ ma
      In English: Sorry, do you mind stepping aside?

    For the phrases mentioned above, you can use different forms of “sorry” depending on the degree of importance regarding the specific event, and the part after the comma conveys different situations. Please feel free to substitute the phrase, keeping in mind that 对不起 indicates the strongest degree of apology, and 抱歉 is the second strongest one. 不好意思 indicates the least degree of apology of the three. You can always add some additional explanation after saying sorry, to make your situation more clear so that people can better understand your apology.

    • In Chinese: 打扰一下,请问发生什么了?
      Pinyin: dǎ rǎo yī xià, qǐng wèn fā shēng shén me le
      In English: Excuse me, what happened?

    Although “Excuse me” in English indicates a sorry feeling, in Chinese it literally means “allow me to disturb you,” where 打扰 means “to disturb.”


    4. Condolences

    • In Chinese: 很抱歉听到这个消息。
      Pinyin: hěn bào qiàn tīng dào zhè gè xiāo xī
      In English: I am sorry to hear that.

    When learning how to say “I am sorry to hear that” in Chinese, you can now entail what we learned earlier. 抱歉, in this sentence, is used to express some specific event that you feel sorry about. You can also substitute 听到这个消息 meaning “to hear the news,” with many other things that you want to express your sadness about. This also goes for “I am sorry that…”.

    • In Chinese: 节哀顺变。
      Pinyin: jiē āi shùn biàn
      In English: I am so sorry for your loss.

    Learning how to say “sorry for your loss” in Chinese may be one of the most important phrases you can master, and can be the difference between clearly expressing your sorrow for a loved one—or failing to. This is an old traditional phrase for comforting people who lost someone dear to them. 节哀 means “repress sadness,” and 顺变 means “let go of the accident and change.”


    5. Other Expressions

    Ways to Say Sorry

    • In Chinese: 我向你赔礼道歉。
      Pinyin: wǒ xiàng nǐ péi lǐ dào qiàn
      In English: Let me apologize to you.

    赔礼 represents the action of compensating a formality for apologizing, which suggests a serious situation. When you use it, it may require some physical performance to fully express the apology, such as a bow or treating the person to a meal.

    • In Chinese: 你能原谅我吗?
      Pinyin: nǐ néng yuán liàng wǒ ma
      In English: Will you forgive me?

    This phrase conveys a powerful desire for forgiveness, which is usually used for a fault that’s caused by a very serious condition.

    • In Chinese: 你别生气啊。
      Pinyin: nǐ bié shēng qì a
      In English: Don’t be mad.

    This can be used for both serious and casual occasions when apologizing. Whenever a sentence-final interjection such as 啊 is included, the sentence is usually not as formal or serious, and indicates a softer expression.

    • In Chinese: 我不是故意的。
      Pinyin: wǒ bú shì gù yì de
      In English: I didn’t do it on purpose.

    You can definitely use this phrase for self-defense for an act you didn’t intentionally commit. It’s usually added right after a “sorry” phrase.

    • In Chinese: 你别怪我啊。
      Pinyin: nǐ bié guài wǒ a
      In English: Please don’t blame me.

    怪 can mean different things depending on the situation. For example, for an adjective it can mean “weird” or “strange.” Please keep in mind that it’s used as a verb meaning “blame” here.


    6. How to respond

    • In Chinese: 没关系。
      Pinyin: méi guān xi
      In English: It’s fine.
    • In Chinese: 没事。
      Pinyin: méi shì
      In English: It’s okay.
    • In Chinese: 没什么大不了的。
      Pinyin: méi shén me dà bú liǎo de
      In English: It is no big deal.
    • In Chinese: 这有什么的。
      Pinyin: zhè yǒu shén me de
      In English: That is nothing.
    • In Chinese: 别放在心上。
      Pinyin: bié fàng zài xīn shàng
      In English: Don’t mind it.


    7. Conclusion

    Are you gaining more confidence after learning all the expressions along with the explicit explanations provided? It’s not as difficult as you thought, as long as you come to the right teacher and source to study Chinese!

    Fortunately, here at ChineseClass101.com, you can find just this. Here, you’ll be able to obtain a delightful learning experience and acquire the best resources to help you speak Chinese like a native. What are you waiting for? Come visit us right now!

    In the meantime, be sure to continue practicing these various ways of how to say “I am sorry” in the Chinese language. You’ll get the hang of it in no time!

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    The Chinese Double Ninth Festival

    Each year, the Chinese celebrate the age-old Double Ninth Festival, which is sometimes referred to as the Chongyang Festival or Senior Day. Few Chinese holidays reach as far back into history as this one does, with origins in the Han Dynasty. Further, the Double Ninth Festival reflects many of the values and beliefs most dear to the Chinese people, such as respect for ancestors and the elderly.

    In this article, you’ll learn all about the Double Ninth Festival in Chinese culture, including its most notable traditions. As any successful language-learner can tell you, understanding a country’s culture is a vital step in mastering the language. And at ChineseClass101.com, we hope to make every aspect of your language-learning journey both fun and informative, including this one!

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    1. What is the Double Ninth Festival?

    The Double Ninth Festival (Chongyang) originated from ancient times, as early as the Han Dynasty, when people celebrated the autumn harvest for the year. Essentially, the Double Ninth Festival is a day for Chinese people to avoid bad luck (we’ll explain how later) and to show respect and honor toward one’s ancestors.

    According to the Double Ninth Festival story, there was once a man who was warned about danger to his village. He listened to the warning, escaped into the mountains, and thus survived the village catastrophe. This explains the focus on ascending heights to avoid ill fortune.

    2. When is the Double Ninth Festival?

    Ninth Day of Ninth Lunar Month

    The date of Double Ninth Day is on the ninth day of the ninth lunar month, hence its name. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date for the next ten years.

    • 2019: October 7
    • 2020: October 25
    • 2021: October 14
    • 2022: October 4
    • 2023: October 23
    • 2024: October 11
    • 2025: October 29
    • 2026: October 18
    • 2027: October 8
    • 2028: October 26

    3. Double Ninth Festival Celebrations & Traditions

    During the crisp autumn days, what interesting celebrations do people hold? Well, Double Ninth Festival traditions are many.

    Traditionally, the customs of the Double Ninth Festival include ascending heights, enjoying chrysanthemums, and drinking. “Ascending heights” is an elegant way to say hiking. In many northern areas, autumn is the best time to be outdoors, with clear skies and crisp air. Hence, many people choose to go out, hike, and enjoy the views.

    At the Double Ninth Festival, people not only ascend heights, but also eat Chongyang cake. In Chinese, “cake” (gao) is a homonym of “height” (gao), which has an auspicious sense of rising step-by-step.

    The chrysanthemum symbolizes longevity and is one of the most popular flowers in China. There has long been a tradition of enjoying chrysanthemums at the Double Ninth Festival. Hence, the Double Ninth Festival is also called the Chrysanthemum Festival. In fact, the whole ninth lunar month is the month of chrysanthemums. Many flower markets and botanical gardens hold chrysanthemum exhibitions one after another, attracting tourists to enjoy and take photos.

    At the Double Ninth Festival, people drink chrysanthemum wine, which is made from chrysanthemums and glutinous rice. It’s said that chrysanthemum wine can protect eyesight and prevent aging. If you like drinking, you may want to try it.

    In recent years, the Double Ninth Festival has also been called the Elderly Festival since, in Chinese, “nine” is a homonym of “long,” which represents long life. Thus, people usually commemorate their ancestors or organize activities to show respect to the elderly on this day. For example, many primary schools and middle schools take students to work as volunteers in nursing homes, and some medical centers also offer free health consultations to the elderly.

    4. Why is it Called Chongyang?

    Paying

    Why do we call Double Ninth Day Chongyang in Chinese?

    In ancient China, numbers were subdivided into two opposing types: Yin (feminine) and Yang (masculine). Since nine is a Yang number and the ninth day of the ninth lunar month has two Yang numbers, it is called Chong (double) Yang.

    5. Essential Vocabulary for the Double Ninth Festival

    Chrysanthemum Flower

    Here’s the essential vocabulary you need to know for the Chinese Double Ninth Festival!

    • 菊花 (júhuā) — chrysanthemum
    • 登高 (dēnggāo) — climb a mountain
    • 郊游 (jiāoyóu) — picnic
    • 风筝 (fēngzhēng) — kite
    • 香 (xiāng) — incense
    • 菊花酒 (júhuā jiǔ) — chrysanthemum wine
    • 重阳糕 (Chóngyáng gāo) — Chung Yeung rice cake
    • 久 (jiǔ) — long time
    • 祭祖 (jìzǔ) — pay respect at ancestors’ grave
    • 九月九 (jiǔyuè jiǔ) — the ninth day of the ninth lunar month
    • 重阳节 (Chóngyáng jié) — Double Ninth Festival

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, and accompanied by relevant images, check out our Double Ninth Festival vocabulary list!

    How ChineseClass101 Can Help You Master Chinese

    What are your thoughts on the Double Ninth Festival in China? Is there any similar holiday in your country? Let us know in the comments; we always look forward to hearing from you.

    To continue learning about Chinese culture and the language, explore ChineseClass101.com. We provide an array of fun and effective learning tools for every learner, at every level:

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    Mao Zedong & The Communist Party of China: CPC Founding Day

    With two important festivals celebrated on the same day, no wonder this day bustles with colored flags fluttering and is full of excitement! What are the activities involved in this celebration, and who was Mao Zedong?

    Let’s take a look at these two festivals to help you better understand the Chinese culture as a whole. After all, sound cultural knowledge is one of the most important steps in mastering a language. And at ChineseClass101.com, we hope to make this learning journey both fun and informative!

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    1. What are CPC Founding Day & Hong Kong’s Return Anniversary?

    July 1 is the anniversary of the founding of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) and the anniversary of Hong Kong’s return to China.

    In July, 1921, communist organizations from different areas of China sent their representatives to Shanghai to hold the First Congress of the Chinese Communist Party and declared the establishment of the CCP. Mao Zedong, the founder of Communist Party of China, suggested setting July 1 as the anniversary of the CCP’s “birthday,” which is usually called the “Party’s Birthday.”

    Also, July 1 is the anniversary of the Return of Hong Kong, commonly known as the “Ninety Seven Return,” (or “the transfer of sovereignty over Hong Kong,” or “Hong Kong handover“), and mainland China refers to this day as Hong Kong returning to its motherland.

    These all refer to the historical event when the United Kingdom handed the sovereignty of Hong Kong back to the People’s Republic of China. This Hong Kong return to China is one of the most significant aspects of China’s history.

    What was the Cultural Revolution in China?

    The Cultural Revolution in China largely had to do with promoting Maoism and finding ways to preserve Chinese communism. So, when was the Cultural Revolution in China?

    Beginning in 1966, the end of the Cultural Revolution in China was in 1976. In 1976, Deng Xiaoping worked with reformers to undue much of the Maoist policies within the Party.

    2. CPC Founding Day & Hong Kong Return Anniversary Date

    Man Speaking in Front of People

    Each year, the Chinese observe CPC Founding Day and Anniversary of the Return of Hong Kong on July 1.

    3. Reading Practice: How is CPC Day Celebrated?

    How does China celebrate these two events? Read the Simplified Chinese text below to find out, and find the English translation directly below it.

    这一节日虽然政治气氛浓厚,由于举国上下共同庆祝的气氛的烘托,也成为中国节日文化的一部分。这一天,电视台会播放大型庆祝晚会。也会有许多回顾建党历史的纪录片、电视剧等影视作品接连上映,带领人们重温历史,展望未来。

    “一国两制”是一个在中国的电视新闻上出现频率颇高的词汇,即”一个国家,两种制度”。意思是在一个中国的前提下,香港、澳门作为特别行政区保持原有的制度和生活方式长期不变。”一国两制”是前中国领导人邓小平为了实现中国统一的目标而创造、提出的方针。

    Although July 1 originated from political events, the celebrations across the whole country have made it part of China’s holiday culture. On July 1, a celebratory evening party is broadcast on TV. Documentaries, films, and TV series regarding the CCP will also be on show to tell people about the past and to draw pictures of the future.

    Yi Guo Liang Zhi is a phrase that frequently appears in TV news, and it means “one country, two political systems.” Hong Kong and Macao are special administrative regions where their established system can be retained under a high degree of autonomy for a certain period. It is a principle originally proposed by China’s former leader Deng Xiaoping for the unification of China.

    4. How Long is the Holiday?

    Flowers and Wreaths on Graves

    How long is the holiday for these two events?

    Despite being of great significance, July 1 is not a public holiday with days off. CCP members even need to attend meetings on July 1 and report their ideological work.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for these Two Chinese Holidays

    Communist Flag

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for CPC Founding Day in China!

    • 政党 (zhèngdǎng) — political party
    • 毛泽东 (Máo Zédōng) — Mao Zedong
    • 邓小平 (Dèng Xiǎopíng) — Deng Xiaoping
    • 文化大革命 (Wénhuà Dà Gémìng) — Cultural Revolution
    • 纪念 (jìniàn) — commemoration
    • 共产主义 (gòngchǎn zhǔyì) — communism
    • 共产党 (Gòngchǎn Dǎng) — Communist Party of China
    • 马列主义 (Mǎ Liè Zhǔyì) — Marxism-Leninism
    • 社会主义 (Shèhuì Zhǔyì) — Socialism
    • 解放 (jiěfàng) — liberate
    • 建党节 (jiàndǎng jié) — CPC Founding Day

    To hear each vocabulary word pronounced, check out our CPC Founding Day vocabulary list.

    Conclusion

    We hope you enjoyed learning about CPC Founding Day and the Anniversary of the Return of Hong Kong with us! Did you learn anything new? Let us know in the comments!

    To continue learning about Chinese culture and the language, visit us at ChineseClass101.com and create a free account! We provide fun and effective learning tools for every learner, including free Chinese vocabulary lists and more insightful blog posts like this one. You can also begin using our online community forums, and with a Premium Plus account, you can start learning Chinese one-on-one with your own personal teacher using our MyTeacher program!

    Know that your hard work will soon reap benefits, and you’ll be speaking, reading, and writing Chinese like a native before you know it!

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    How to Celebrate the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival

    One of China’s most popular holidays around the world is the Dragon Boat Festival. The Dragon Boat Festival seeks to commemorate the suicide of Qu Yuan, a heroic poet. While a bit dark, the Dragon Boat Festival history is a unique facet of Chinese culture as a whole.

    At ChineseClass101.com, we hope to make learning Chinese both fun and informative, especially when it comes to the culture and the history behind it. Any successful language learner can tell you that this is a vital step in mastering a language.

    That said, we hope you enjoy learning about the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival with us!

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    1. What is the Dragon Boat Festival?

    The Dragon Boat Festival is a Chinese traditional festival to commemorate a hero named Qu Yuan.

    Qu Yuan was a politician and poet who lived two thousand years ago. He had been a court official in the State of Chu. He was very loyal, but the King believed the words of the treacherous instead and exiled him. Feeling humiliated, he jumped into a river on May 5 to end his life. It is said that people missed him greatly after his death. They began boating on the same river and this activity gradually evolved into Dragon Boat racing.

    2. When is Dragon Boat Festival?

    A Dragon Boat

    So, when is the Dragon Boat Festival?

    Each year, China celebrates the Dragon Boat Festival on the fifth day of the fifth month of the lunar calendar. For your convenience, here’s a list of this holiday’s date on the Gregorian calendar for the next ten years.

    • 2019: June 7
    • 2020: June 25
    • 2021: June 14
    • 2022: June 3
    • 2023: June 22
    • 2024: June 10
    • 2025: May 31
    • 2026: June 19
    • 2027: June 9
    • 2028: May 28

    3. Reading Practice: Chinese Dragon Boat Festival Traditions

    How do the Chinese celebrate the Dragon Boat Festival? Read the Simplified Chinese below to learn about Chinese Dragon Boat Festival traditions (including Dragon Boat Festival food!), and find the English translation directly below it.

    说到赛龙舟,这是一项非常受欢迎的传统竞技。龙舟就是小船,赛龙舟就是划船比赛。比赛的时候,每个穿上安排25名船员,由其中一人指挥,2人敲鼓,其他人齐心协力,力争最快划到终点。赛龙舟最吸引人的是它热闹的气氛,龙舟上鼓声震天,喊声不绝;两岸围观的观众也络绎不绝。

    而在端午节一定要吃的食物当然是粽子了。传说屈原跳江后,人们不忍心他的躯体被江河里的鱼虾吃掉,便做了很多带馅儿的团子撒到水里喂鱼——这就是粽子的由来。那么粽子是什么样的呢?最里面是枣、豆沙等做成的馅儿,由浸泡好的糯米包裹,最外面再包上粽子叶。煮好以后剥掉粽子叶,蘸白糖吃。

    古时候人们认为端午节这天在家门口悬挂艾叶能避邪气。现代科学发现,艾叶的确能起到杀菌消毒、预防瘟疫流行的作用。

    The dragon boat race is a very popular tradition. Dragon boats are small boats, and the dragon boat race is a boating race. There are twenty-five members on each boat: one in command, two playing the drums, and the rest making rigorous efforts to be the fastest to reach the finish line. What attracts people most is the atmosphere of the race. On the dragon boat, the drums sound like thunder, and the crew members’ shouts are never-ending. On both sides of the river bank is an endless stream of spectators.

    During the Dragon Boat Festival, you must not miss out on eating rice dumplings. Legend says that after Qu Yuan jumped into the river, people didn’t want his body to be eaten by river fish; they made many dumplings with fillings and threw them into the river to feed the fish. This is the origin of the rice dumpling. So, what does a rice dumpling look like? Fillings such as jujube, red bean paste, or others are put inside soaked glutinous rice, and the rice is wrapped in bamboo leaves. After boiling, you can peel off the leaves and dip the rice dumplings in sugar to eat them.

    In ancient times, people believed that hanging wormwood leaves on the door of their home could keep evil away. Modern science has found that wormwood leaves can sterilize and prevent plague infection.

    4. How Traditions Relate to Qu Yuan

    Sweet Rice Dumplings

    Which customs in the Dragon Boat Festival (China) commemorate Qu Yuan?

    The Dragon Boat Festival itself is a festival to commemorate Qu Yuan. The customs related to Qu Yuan include the dragon boat race and eating rice dumplings.

    5. Useful Vocabulary for the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival

    Playing on Gongs and Drums

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for the Chinese Dragon Boat Festival!

    • 端午节 (Duānwǔ Jié) — Dragon Boat Festival
    • 屈原 (Qū Yuán) — Qu Yuan
    • 龙舟赛 (lóngzhōu sài) — dragon boat race
    • 龙舟 (lóngzhōu) — dragon boat
    • 糯米 (nuòmǐ) — glutinous rice
    • 锣鼓 (luó gǔ) — gongs and drums
    • 雄黄酒 (xiónghuáng jiǔ) — realgar wine
    • 粽 (zòng) — rice dumpling stuffed with meat
    • 划龙舟 (huá lóngzhōu) — row a dragon boat
    • 甜粽 (tiánzòng) — sweet rice dumpling

    To hear each of these vocabulary words pronounced, check out our Chinese Dragon Boat Festival vocabulary list. Here, each word is accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think of the Dragon Boat Festival in China? Does your country have a similar holiday or festival? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn more about the culture in China and the Chinese language, visit us at ChineseClass101.com! It’s our aim to make learning Chinese both fun and informative, and to ensure that every learner can master the language. We offer an array of useful learning tools, from insightful blog posts like this one to free Chinese vocabulary lists. You can also discuss lessons with fellow Chinese learners on our community forum, and upgrade to Premium Plus to take advantage of our MyTeacher program!

    We hope you took away something valuable from this lesson, and that you feel more knowledgeable about this facet of Chinese culture. Know that your hard work will pay off, and you’ll be speaking Chinese like a native before you know it!

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    The May Fourth Movement & Chinese Youth Day

    Why is it important to celebrate Youth Day?

    The May Fourth Movement in China was one of the most significant events in Chinese history, when university students in 1919 stood up and spoke out about unfair treaties at the Paris Peace Conference. This began anti-imperialism and patriotism in China, and marked the beginning of the New Democratic Revolution in China.

    It’s no wonder that China places such value on its youth. They made an important stand in the past, and can do so in the future, thus earning their May 4th holiday. During Golden Week, China makes sure to honor its youth on this day.

    At ChineseClass101.com, we hope to make your learning experience both fun and informative as we delve into this defining characteristic of Chinese culture: Youth Day in China during the Chinese Golden Week holiday season.

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    1. What is Chinese Youth Day?

    In China, the Golden Week holiday Youth Day is used to commemorate the May Fourth Movement on May 4, 1919, which raised the flag of anti-imperialism and patriotism in China.

    In China’s modern history, the May Fourth Movement has great significance, so Youth Day is accompanied by profound historical influence. On May 1, 1919, students from universities in Beijing organized a massive protest against unequal treaties signed by the government at the Paris Peace Conference. This movement marked the beginning of the New Democratic Revolution in China.

    Though almost a century has passed since the May Fourth Movement, its spirit of patriotism, progress, democracy, and science is still advocated in contemporary China. “May Fourth” has become a cultural symbol and “May Fourth Youth” symbolize the patriotic youth.

    2. When is Youth Day?

    Dragon Image on Red Background

    Each year, Chinese Youth Day is celebrated on May 4. Young people in China have a half-day off to celebrate this public holiday.

    3. Reading Practice: How is Youth Day Celebrated?

    People Packing Things into Car

    How is Youth Day celebrated in China? Read the simplified Chinese text below to find out (and find the English translation directly below it).

    如今在五四青年节期间,中国各地都会举行丰富多采的纪念活动,学校和单位里的”共青团”会组织青年们集中进行社会志愿和社会实践活动,比如去敬老院服务一天,十字路口帮助交通协管员维护交通秩序之类的。还有许多高中在青年节期间为即将毕业的高三生举行成人仪式,也叫作”成人冠礼”。

    近年各大高校校园内刮起一股”民国风”,许多大学生在五四这一天身穿当年流行的民国学生制服

    Today, there are various activities of celebration on Youth Day. The Youth Leagues will organize young people to participate in social activities, such as volunteering in nursing homes or helping traffic coordinators maintain traffic order. Many high schools will hold a coming of age ceremony called “Guan Li” for junior students who are graduating shortly after the Youth Day.

    In recent years, the Republican style has become prevalent in universities. Many university students wear the student uniforms of those during the time of the Republic of China, as a way of celebration.

    4. Additional Information: What is Youth?

    So, Youth Day in China sounds like a great holiday. But who are able to participate in the half-day off? What is the legal definition of youth in China?

    On Youth Day, China focuses on people between age fourteen and age twenty-eight. More than 300-million young people can have a half-day holiday on May 4.

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Fist Held High in Air

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for Youth Day in China!

    • 鲁迅 (Lǔ Xùn) — Lu Xun
    • 五四运动 (Wǔsì Yùndòng) — May Fourth Movement
    • 革命 (gémìng) — revolution
    • 纪念 (jìniàn) — commemoration
    • 爱国主义 (àiguó zhǔyì) — patriotism
    • 五四青年节 (Wǔsìqīngniánjié) — Youth Day
    • 成人仪式 (chéngrén yíshì) — come of age ceremony
    • 五一长假 (Wǔyī chángjià) — Golden Week
    • 传统 (chuántǒng) — tradition
    • 游行 (yóuxíng) — demonstration

    To hear each of these words pronounced, check out our Chinese Youth Day vocabulary list, where you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio file of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think of China’s Youth Day? Does your country hold a celebration dedicated to its youth? Let us know in the comments!

    To learn even more about the culture in China and the language, visit us at ChineseClass101.com. From insightful blog posts to free vocabulary lists, and even an online community where you can discuss lessons with fellow students, there’s something here for every Chinese learner! You can also take advantage of our MyTeacher program with a Premium Plus account, to learn Chinese one-on-one with your own personal teacher.

    Until next time, best wishes on your Chinese language-learning journey. Your determination, hard work, and practice will pay off, and before you know it, you’ll be speaking like a native! And ChineseClass101.com will be here every step of your way there.

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    Qingming Festival: The Tomb Sweeping Holiday in China

    The Chinese Qingming Festival is one of the most significant, culturally rich holidays in the country. Essentially, this day is reserved for honoring one’s filial piety by paying respect to deceased family and ancestors. As the holiday’s other name—Tomb Sweeping Day—indicates, people visit the graves of their ancestors to clean them and burn incense as a show of respect.

    By learning about the Tomb Sweeping holiday China celebrates each year, you’re opening up your eyes to Chinese culture and providing yourself a firmer foundation for your language-learning. At ChineseClass101.com, we hope to make this learning experience both fun and insightful! Learn more about the Qingming Festival in China with us!

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    1. What is the Qingming Festival?

    Tomb Sweeping Day is a day for worshipping ancestors. This is an important aspect of Chinese culture, and the China Tomb Sweeping Day holiday is reserved just for this. Chinese people travel (sometimes long distances) to clean the graves of their ancestors, as well as burn incense and special joss paper. This early spring holiday is a strong representation of the Chinese value of filial piety.

    Learn more Qingming Festival facts below!

    2. When is the Chinese Qingming Festival?

    Tomb Sweeping Day in April

    Each year, the Qingming Festival is typically celebrated on April 4 or 5, though sometimes it takes place on April 6. Though the date doesn’t vary too much from year to year, we’ll still provide you with an outline of this holiday’s date for the next ten years:

    • 2019: April 5
    • 2020: April 4
    • 2021: April 4
    • 2022: April 5
    • 2023: April 5
    • 2024: April 4
    • 2025: April 4
    • 2026: April 6
    • 2027: April 5
    • 2028: April 4

    3. Reading Practice: How is the Qingming Festival Celebrated?

    Joss paper

    How is the Qingming Festival celebrated? Read the Chinese text below to find out (you can find the English translation directly below it).


    富裕的家庭会在祖先的墓碑前 上香,但你也会看到许多人在街边烧纸钱。 纸钱 是烧给逝者的一些仿造的纸币,人们相信辞世的祖先在阴间也需要花钱。近年来,商家的想象力也变得 格外 丰富。你会看到各式各样的新式”纸钱”:有纸张做的美女、别墅、甚至麻将之类的东西,随着iPhone的流行,最近竟然还有纸质的iPhone 贩卖。
    中国素有红白喜事,”红”指结婚,而”白”就是指亲人的离世了。人的生死是大事,尤其在重视家庭传统的中国。销售花圈、寿衣以及扫墓相关商品的”殡葬业”,这几年频频被媒体指摘为暴利行业。

    踏青也是清明节的一项传统。踏青,又叫春游。四月份春回大地,到处呈现一派生机勃勃的景象,正是郊游的好时光。而放风筝也是清明时节人们所喜爱的活动。人们不仅白天放,夜间也放。这个节日中既有思念逝去亲人的悲伤,又有踏青游玩的欢笑声,是一个非常独特的节日。现在越来越多的人选择骨灰处理的方式,买。。。。

    Wealthy families will burn incense in front of their ancestors’ tombs. Also you can see many people burning joss paper along the streets. Joss paper is a kind of fake money made to be burned for the deceased, as people believe that their deceased ancestors need money in the underworld. In recent years, the market for joss paper has become particularly creative. You can see various new shapes of joss paper such as paper beauties, paper houses, even paper Mahjong pieces. Joss paper versions of iPhones are also being sold these days because iPhones are so popular.
    In China, there is a well-known saying: “wear red or white.” “Red” refers to getting married and “white” means the passing away of relatives. Birth and death are important events in peoples’ lives, especially in China, where family is greatly valued. In recent years, the “funeral industry” that sells wreaths, grave shrouds, and other related goods for sweeping tombs, has been frequently criticized as engaging in profiteering by the mass media.
    Going out during the Tomb Sweeping Festival is also a tradition. It is also called the Spring Outing. In April, with the return of spring, lively and vibrant scenes are everywhere, making it a great time for an outing. Flying kites is a popular activity for the Tomb Sweeping Festival. People fly kites both at night and during the day. The sorrow of missing loved ones who have passed and happiness from the outing combines in this festival, making it very special.

    4. Additional Information

    There are many traditional taboos for the Tomb Sweeping Festival. For example, people should avoid fire, using needles, and washing clothes on that day; in most regions, women should avoid walking. However, people rarely observe these traditions in modern times.

    Also note that people can take three days off for the Tomb Sweeping Festival. Unless it’s Spring Festival, National Day, or Labor Day, people can only take one day off for all the other national holidays in China. From this, you can see the importance of the Tomb Sweeping Festival.

    One of the most common Qingming Festival foods is sweet green rice balls, a favorite for this holiday. These are prepared in advance, to free up the actual holiday for the traditional activities.

    5. Must-know Vocab

    Studying vocabulary

    Here’s some vocabulary you should know for the Qingming Festival in China!

    • 重要性 (zhòngyàoxìng) — importance
    • 国庆节 (Guóqìng jié) — national day
    • 劳动节 (láodòng jié) — labor day
    • 贩卖 (fànmài) — to sell
    • 行路 (xínglù) — walking on the road
    • 刻意 (kèyì) — deliberately
    • 红白喜事 (hóngbái xǐshì) — weddings and funerals
    • 格外 (géwài) — extraordinary
    • 忌 () — to avoid
    • 上香 (shàngxiāng) — to burn incense
    • 祭祖 (jìzǔ) — to worship ancestors
    • 烧香 (shāoxiāng) — burning incense
    • 纸钱 (zhǐqián) — paper money
    • 踏青 (tàqīng) — outing
    • 清明节 (qīngmíng jié) — Qingming festival
    • 扫墓 (sǎomù) — grave-sweeping
    • 殡葬业 (bìnzàng yè) — funeral industry
    • 暴利 (bàolì) — excessive profit
    • 指摘 (zhǐzhāi) — accusation
    • 生机勃勃 (shēngjībóbó) — vibrant

    You can check out this lesson on the Tomb Sweeping Festival to hear each word pronounced. Here, you’ll find each word accompanied by an audio of its pronunciation.

    Conclusion

    What do you think about the Qingming Festival in China? Is there a similar holiday in your own country? Let us know in the comments!

    We hope you enjoyed learning about China’s Tomb Sweeping Day with us. If so, you can visit us at ChineseClass101.com for more information on Chinese culture and the Chinese language. We offer an array of insightful blog posts, free vocabulary lists, and on online community to discuss lessons with fellow Chinese learners. You can also upgrade to Premium Plus to take advantage of a one-on-one learning experience with our MyTeacher program!

    Know that your hard will pay off, and with enough practice and determination, you’ll be speaking Chinese like a native before you know it! We wish you the best in your language-learning journey.

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